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Inductee Search

College football legends live here. Search below through the database of all College Football Hall of Fame members.

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About the Hall of Fame

  • Located in the heart of Downtown Atlanta, the College Football Hall of Fame and Chick-fil-A Fan Experience showcases the legends of the game within an exciting, entertaining attraction that redefines what a Hall of Fame can be.

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About the Hall of Fame

The $66.5 million facility spans more than 94,000 square feet, housing 30,000 feet of exhibit space and a 45-yard indoor football field that serves as a unique, flexible programming and event space. Adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center, the Georgia Dome and the Omni Hotel, the Hall is just steps from Centennial Olympic Park, the World of Coca-Cola, the Georgia Aquarium, CNN Center, the Imagine It! Children’s Museum, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, as well as numerous dining and hotel options.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  • Members of the National Football Foundation, as well as athletics directors, coaches and members of CoSIDA are responsible for the final vote induction into the Hall of Fame.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  1. FIRST AND FOREMOST, A PLAYER MUST HAVE RECEIVED FIRST-TEAM ALL-AMERICA RECOGNITION BY A SELECTOR RECOGNIZED BY THE NCAA AND UTILIZED TO COMPRISE THEIR CONSENSUS ALL-AMERICA TEAMS.
  2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the NFF\'s Honors Court 10 years after his last year of intercollegiate football played.
  3. While each nominee\'s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post-football record as a citizen is also weighed. He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man. Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.
  4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*. For example, to be eligible for the 2014 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1964 or thereafter. In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.
  5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years old. Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age. He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage*.
* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

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2013

Art Shell

Offensive Tackle

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2013

Art Shell

Position:
Offensive Tackle
School
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, 1964 to 1967
Jersey Number:
73
Inducted:
2013
High School:
North Charleston, SC (Bonds-Wilson HS)
Place of Birth:
Charleston, SC
Date of Birth:
November 26/1946
Height:
6'5
Weight:
265

Biography

Art Shell, played both offensive and defensive tackle, and claimed both Little All-American and Pittsburgh Courier Black College All-America honors in 1967. The three-time All-Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) performer led UMES to a 20-8-1 record during his career. Shell was drafted by the AFL’s Oakland Raiders and became an eight-time Pro Bowl selection and three-time first- team All-Pro. The three-time Super Bowl champion (XI, XV, XVIII) participated in 24 playoff appearances with the Raiders and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1989. Following his playing days, he was twice named the head coach of the Raiders, becoming the first African-American to head a modern-day NFL team. Shell served as a joint NFL/NFLPA representative to review fines and suspensions levied for on-field misconduct.

2013

Rod Shoate

Linebacker

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2013

Rod Shoate

Position:
Linebacker
School
University of Oklahoma, 1972 to 1974
Jersey Number:
43
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Spiro, OK (Spiro HS)
Place of Birth:
Spiro, OK
Date of Birth:
April 25/1953
Place of Death:
Spiro, OK
Date of Death:
October 4/1999
Height:
6'1
Weight:
213

Biography

Combining the speed of a running back with exceptional strength, Rod Shoate became a dominant defensive force at perennial football powerhouse Oklahoma in the early 1970s. A two-time first-team All-American (consensus – 1973, unanimous – 1974), Shoate guided OU to a perfect 11-0 season and the National Championship in 1974, building on a 10-0-1 record the year before. The Sooners went 29-4-1 during Shoate’s career, never finishing with a national ranking lower than No. 3. He was twice named the Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year as the Sooners claimed the conference crown in each of those seasons. He led Oklahoma to a 14-0 shutout of Penn State in the 1972 Sugar Bowl. Shoate led the Sooners in tackles for three straight seasons with 420 career tackles. Picked by New England in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, Shoate enjoyed a six year career with the Patriots before playing two seasons in the USFL. The Spiro, Okla., native passed away on Oct. 4, 1999.

2013

Percy Snow

Linebacker

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2013

Percy Snow

Position:
Linebacker
School
Michigan State University, 1986 to 1989
Jersey Number:
48
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Canton, OH (McKinley HS)
Place of Birth:
Canton, OH
Date of Birth:
November 5/1967
Height:
6'3
Weight:
240

Biography

The first player in college football history to win both the Butkus and Lombardi trophies in the same season, Percy Snow served as the backbone of Michigan State’s famed “Gang Green” defense in the late 1980s. Voted a unanimous first-team All-American selection as a senior, Snow led the team in tackles for three consecutive seasons, and ranked second all-time in total tackles (473) at MSU. Snow was a three-time all-conference selection, helping the Spartans to the 1987 Big Ten title and a 1988 Rose Bowl win in which he earned MVP honors after recording 17 tackles against Southern California. He also led MSU to the Gator and Aloha bowls under head coach George Perles after the 1988 and 1989 seasons, respectively. The winner of the MSU “Governor of Michigan” award as the team MVP, he reached double figures in tackles 11 times as a senior, including a career-high 23 versus Illinois. Selected in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft by Kansas City, Snow played in the NFL for four seasons with the Chiefs and Chicago Bears. The Canton, Ohio, native was inducted into the Michigan State Hall of Fame in 2010.

2013

Tommie Frazier

Quarterback

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2013

Tommie Frazier

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Nebraska, 1992 to 1995
Jersey Number:
15
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Bradenton, FL (Manatee HS)
Place of Birth:
Bradenton, FL
Date of Birth:
July 16/1974
Height:
6'2"
Weight:
205

Biography

A legend in a long line of great Big Eight quarterbacks, Tommie Frazier helped College Football Hall of Fame coach Tom Osborne and Nebraska to back-to-back perfect national championship seasons in 1994 and 1995. The 1995 consensus first-team All-American and Johnny Unitas Award winner was runner-up for the 1995 Heisman Trophy and a finalist for the Walter Camp and Maxwell awards. Frazier led Nebraska to four consecutive bowl appearances, claiming MVP honors in the 1995 Orange and 1996 Fiesta bowls en route to the national title. Frazier missed seven games during the 1994 season due to blood clots, but the junior was able to return and direct Nebraska’s come-from-behind win over Miami in the national title game. The 1995 Big Eight Player of the Year set a conference record with a 33-3 overall career record as a starter. Frazier won the Big Eight title in all four of his seasons, posting three straight years of undefeated league play. Frazier played for the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League in 1996 before trying his hand at the coaching profession. He coached at Baylor and Nebraska before being named the head coach at Doane College (Neb.), spending two seasons at the school. Coached by legendary Hall of Famer Tom Osborne, Frazier was named to Sports Illustrated’s All-Century Team, and his jersey has been retired by Nebraska.

2013

Steve "Mr Anywhere" Meilinger

End

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2013

Steve "Mr Anywhere" Meilinger

Position:
End
School
University of Kentucky, 1951 to 1953
Jersey Number:
80
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Bethlehelm, PA (Liberty HS), Fork Union, VA (Fork Union Military)
Place of Birth:
Bethlehelm, PA
Date of Birth:
June 12/1930
Height:
6'1
Weight:
217

Biography

Steve Meilinger gained fame as “Mr. Anywhere” for his versatility and value to the Kentucky football program. The two-time first-team All-America (1952, 1953) selection, under Hall of Fame head coach Bear Bryant, Meilinger led Kentucky to victory in the 1952 Cotton Bowl over TCU. The two-year All-Southeastern Conference honoree played end, halfback and quarterback on offense, while covering end, linebacker and defensive back on defense. He also served as the Wildcats’ two-year starting punter while returning punts and kickoffs. A first round selection by the Washington Redskins in the 1954 NFL Draft, Meilinger played six seasons in the league for the Redskins, Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers. He spent the entirety of his non-football life in military or public service. Immediately following his selection by the Redskins, Meilinger served two years as a tank commander in the U.S. Army’s 100th Tank Battalion of the 1st Armored Division before embarking on his pro football career. From 1962-83, Meilinger was a United States Marshal, and he was one of the original six marshals who founded the U.S. Federal Witness Protection Program. The Bethlehem, Pa., native is a member of the State of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the University of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the Fork Union Military Academy Hall of Fame, the Lehigh Valley (Penn.) Hall of Fame and the Liberty High School Hall of Fame.

2013

Jerry Gray

Safety

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2013

Jerry Gray

Position:
Safety
School
University of Texas, 1981 to 1984
Jersey Number:
2
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Lubbock, TX (Estacado HS)
Place of Birth:
Lubbock, TX
Date of Birth:
December 16/1962
Height:
6'1
Weight:
183

Biography

Defensive back Jerry Gray was instrumental in helping the Texas defense shut down some of the decade’s most high-powered offenses. A two-time first-team All-American (consensus – 1983, unanimous – 1984), Gray led Texas to four consecutive bowl games, including a 1982 Cotton Bowl victory and a No. 2 final national ranking. He was a two-time Southwest Conference Player of the Year (1983, 1984), and he helped the Longhorns win the 1983 conference title under coach Fred Akers. The two-time team MVP recorded 297 career tackles, 16 interceptions, and 20 pass breakups during his time in Austin. Taken in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams, Gray enjoyed a nine-year career, playing for the Rams, Houston Oilers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers and appearing in four Pro Bowls. Following his playing days, Gray spent time as a position football coach in both the college and professional ranks. The Lubbock, Texas, native established the Jerry Gray Foundation for underprivileged youth, which provides athletic and academic scholarships. He also founded and coordinated the Jerry Gray/Young Life Skills and Leadership Football Camp. Gray became a member of the Longhorn Hall of Honor in 1996.

2013

Joe Micchia

Quarterback

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2013

Joe Micchia

Position:
Quarterback
School
Westminster College (PA), 1987 to 1989
Jersey Number:
10
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Sharon, PA (Sharon HS)
Place of Birth:
Youngstown, PA
Date of Birth:
December 30/1966
Height:
6'0
Weight:
195

Biography

A two-time All-America, Joe Micchia led Westminster to back-to-back undefeated seasons en route to consecutive NAIA Division II national championships. The school’s first-ever 4,000-yard passer holds Titans records for career (68) and season (32) touchdown passes, and he went 31-0 as a starter. A two-time national title game MVP, he led his team to a 27-game winning streak that ranked as the nation’s longest among all divisions at the time. After graduating from Westminster, Micchia completed medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1994, later completing his residency in Columbus, Ohio. He worked at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and at North Raleigh Primary Care before forming a practice in Wake Forest, N.C.

2013

Vinny Testaverde

Quarterback

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2013

Vinny Testaverde

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Miami, 1982 to 1986
Jersey Number:
14
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Floral Park, NY (Sewanhka HS), Fort Union, VA (Fort Union Military Academy)
Place of Birth:
Brooklyn, NY
Date of Birth:
November 13/1963
Height:
6'5
Weight:
218

Biography

One of the most celebrated players in a Hurricane history, Miami’s Vinny Testaverde claimed virtually every major award during his senior season in 1986. As a senior, Testaverde earned unanimous first-team All-American honors, and he won the Heisman Trophy, the Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell, Davey O’Brien and UPI Player of the Year awards. He led the Canes to three consecutive bowls, including the 1987 Fiesta Bowl National Championship game. He finished his collegiate career with more than 6,000 passing yards and 48 touchdown passes, and ranked in the top five in virtually every passing category in school history. Testaverde, who was a redshirt on Miami’s 1983 national championship team, went 23-3 as a starter playing for legendary coaches Howard Schnellenberger and Hall of Famer Jimmy Johnson. In 1985, he was a second team All-America and placed fifth in the Heisman voting. Tampa Bay selected Testaverde as the No. 1 overall selection in the 1987 NFL Draft, and his pro career spanned 21 seasons with seven different teams. He was a 1998 All-Pro and two-time Pro Bowl selection.

2013

Don Trull

Quarterback

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2013

Don Trull

Position:
Quarterback
School
Baylor University, 1961 to 1963
Jersey Number:
10
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Oklahoma City, OK (Southeast HS)
Place of Birth:
Oklahoma City, OK
Date of Birth:
November 20/1941
Height:
6'1
Weight:
190

Biography

Passing for more than 4,000 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career, Don Trull left an indelible mark on the Baylor record books while becoming the school’s first-ever NFF National Scholar-Athlete. A 1963 first-team All-American and first-team All-Southwest Conference selection, Trull led the nation in touchdowns and passing yards his senior season. He was a two-time winner of the Sammy Baugh Award for leading the country in completions (1962, 1963), and he finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior. Trull became Baylor’s first two-time first-team Academic All-American honoree in 1962 and 1963 as well as the school’s first NFF National Scholar-Athlete (1963). Trull led the Bears to the 1961 Gotham Bowl and the 1963 Bluebonnet Bowl under coach John Bridges. The Oklahoma City native enjoyed an eight-year career in the professional ranks, playing for the Houston Oilers and Boston Patriots as well as the CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos. Following his playing days, he served as an assistant coach at Arkansas from 1972-74. Trull is a Baylor Hall of Fame inductee, and he was named to the school’s all-decade team.

2013

Frank Cignetti

Coach

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2013

Frank Cignetti

Position:
Coach
Schools
Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1986 to 2005
West Virginia University, 1976 to 1979
Inducted:
2013
Place of Birth:
Apollo, PA
Date of Birth:
October 8/1937
Wins:
199
Losses:
77
Ties:
1
Winning percentage:
0.72

Biography

The most successful head coach in Indiana University of Pennsylvania history, Frank Cignetti led the Hawks to unprecedented success during his 20-year tenure. Under his coaching, IUP ranked in the Top 20 each season from 1986-2004, achieving undefeated regular seasons in 1991 and 1993. Cignetti’s teams received the Lambert Cup 10 times as the top Division II team in the East. He was named the PSAC West Coach of the Year five times and the Kodak College Division Regional Coach of the Year three times en route to earning Chevrolet Division II National Coach of the Year honors in 1991. Cignetti coached 11 First Team All-Americans and 124 First Team All-PSAC performers. Cignetti served as the offensive coordinator at West Virginia University under coach Bobby Bowden from 1970-75 before taking over as the Mountaineers’ head coach for four seasons (1976-79).
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

The College Football Hall of Fame is a lasting tribute to the game’s greatest players and coaches.  The legends represented here have reached the highest level of achievement in the sport, and their stories of excellence and impact - on and off the field - endure here in perpetuity.Scroll through to learn more about all of the inductees of the College Football Hall of Fame, or use the search function to find certain players.

1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Coach

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1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Position:
Coach
Schools
Syracuse University, 1906 to 1907
Columbia University, 1920 to 1922
Syracuse University, 1913 to 1919
Colgate University, 1904 to 1905
Colgate University, 1902 to 1902
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Syracuse, NY
Date of Birth:
March 6/1875
Place of Death:
Hamilton, NY
Date of Death:
April 21/1958
Wins:
81
Losses:
41
Ties:
8
Winning percentage:
0.654

Biography

Frank "Buck" O'Neill played football at Williams College and excelled at track as well as football. He was head coach at Colgate in 1902, again in 1904-05. His teams had an 18-8-2 record there. O'Neill moved to Syracuse and coached there for three terms: 1906-07, 1913-15, and 1917-19. He also maintained a law practice during these years. His eight-year coaching totals at Syracuse were 52-19-6. His best era at Syracuse came from 1915-1918 when the team had a combined 22-3-3 record O'Neill moved to Columbia and in 1920-22 had an 11-14 record. All told, he was a head coach 14 years with a record of 81-41-8. O'Neill was named a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

1951

Bennie Owen

Coach

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1951

Bennie Owen

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Oklahoma, 1905 to 1926
Bethany College (KS), 1901 to 1904
Washburn University, 1900 to 1900
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Chicago, IL
Date of Birth:
July 24/1875
Place of Death:
Houston, TX
Date of Death:
February 26/1970
Wins:
155
Losses:
60
Ties:
19
Winning percentage:
0.703

Biography

Benjamin G. "Bennie" Owen was Fielding Yost's quarterback for the undefeated Kansas team of 1899. The next year he was head coach at Washburn College. Then came years as head coach at Bethany College in Kansas and Oklahoma. In 1907, he lost an arm in a hunting accident. He stayed on the job and carved a career coaching record of 155-60-19 over 27 seasons. He had high scoring teams and was an early exponent of the forward pass. He was known for sportsmanship; his teams were always lectured on fair play. His 1911 team went 8-0 and outscored the enemy 282-15. In 1914 Oklahoma went 9-1-1 and led the nation in scoring with 435 points. Forest Geyer threw 25 touchdown passes that year. The 1915 team went 10-0 and scored 370 points. In 1918, the record was 6-0 and the scoring edge 278-7. Oklahoma won championships in the Southwest Conference in 1915 and 1918 and the Missouri Valley Conference in 1920. Owen served as director of athletics 1927-34. Owen Field, where Oklahoma plays its home games, is named for him. He was born July 24, 1875 in Chicago; he died February 26, 1970, in Houston at age 94. He was a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, elected in 1951.

1951

Germany Schulz

Center

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1951

Germany Schulz

Position:
Center
School
University of Michigan, 1904 to 1908
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Fort Wayne, IN (Fort Wayne HS)
Place of Birth:
Fort Wayne, IN
Date of Birth:
April 19/1883
Place of Death:
Detroit, MI
Date of Death:
April 14/1951
Height:
6'4
Weight:
245

Biography

Adolph "Germany" Schulz stood 6-4, weighed 245, and played center for Michigan in 1904-1905 and 1907-1908. He missed the 1906 season; he had dropped out of school because of a lack of funds. He worked in a steel mill in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and earned the money to return to college. In 1951 the National Football Foundation commissioned the Associated Press to poll the experts and pick the all-time All-America team. Schulz was named at center. He was responsible for two innovations at his position. Before Schulz, centers always sent the ball end-over-end. He invented a spiral snap. Before Schulz, centers always played in the line on defense. He dropped back, became a roving center and football's first linebacker. Michigan had a 32-4-1 record in his four seasons. Schulz served as assistant coach at Michigan, Wisconsin, Tulane, and Kansas State and one year, 1923 as head coach at Detroit. Grantland Rice wrote in 1928: "Schulz stands as the fastest giant who ever played football, a human bulwark fast enough to tackle at either end, as he brought down his man after the manner of a hawk snaring a quail."

1951

Elmer "The Thin Man" Layden

Fullback

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1951

Elmer "The Thin Man" Layden

Position:
Fullback
School
University of Notre Dame, 1922 to 1924
Jersey Number:
5
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Davenport, IA (Davenport HS)
Place of Birth:
Davenport, IA
Date of Birth:
May 4/1903
Place of Death:
Chicago, IL
Date of Death:
June 30/1973
Height:
6'0"
Weight:
162

Biography

It was New Year's Day, 1925, at the Rose Bowl, and the final contest for Notre Dame's famed Four Horsemen. The opponent, Stanford, was ready for an Irish offensive punch which had been headlined across the nation. Instead, it was the defensive prowess of Elmer Layden which buried Stanford, 27-10. Layden, the heaviest of the Four Horsemen at 162 pounds, scored first on a three-yard run before turning a pair of interceptions into touchdowns of 78 and 60 yards. He had tallied three of four Irish touchdowns to provide a final triumph in a perfect ten-game season which brought Notre Dame its first undisputed national championship. Layden was the leading Irish pass-interceptor that season, but his unique running style was equally uncanny. "He developed a straight-line dive that made him one of the most unusual halfbacks in football", praised coach Knute Rockne. The Irish posted a combined record of 27-2-1 during Layden's varsity career. He later served as Irish head coach from 1934 to 1940, compiling a record of 47-13-3 before leaving to become Commissioner of the National Football League for six seasons.

1951

Knute "Rock" Rockne

Coach

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1951

Knute "Rock" Rockne

Position:
Coach
School
University of Notre Dame, 1918 to 1930
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Voss, Norway
Date of Birth:
March 4/1888
Place of Death:
Bazaar, KS
Date of Death:
March 31/1931
Wins:
105
Losses:
12
Ties:
5
Winning percentage:
0.881

Biography

To answer the debate as to who was college football's greatest coach, the argument must always begin with Notre Dame's Knute Rockne. His .881 winning percentage is the highest in major college football history. He had five undefeated seasons, and six others where he lost just one game. His teams won three national titles and he made Notre Dame a team with a national following. From 1918 to 1930, Rockne's Notre Dame elevens had a 105-12-5 record. Rockne's electric personality and the stylish play of his teams captured public imagination during the "Golden Age" of sports in the Roaring Twenties. He perfected such maneuvers as the Notre Dame Shift and helped change the game from one of brute strength to one of speed and deception. His style of play was adopted by countless teams and six of his players would become Hall of Fame coaches. He coached legendary athletes such as George Gipp, Hunk Anderson, Rip Miller, and of course, the Four Horsemen - Harry Stuhldreher, Jim Crowley, Don Miller and Elmer Layden. Then, on March 31, 1931, America and the world mourned the news - Knute Rockne had died in a plane crash at Bazaar, Kansas at the age of 43. Will Rogers paid this tribute: "Notre Dame was Knute Rockne's address, but every gridiron in America was his home."

1951

Bill Roper

Coach

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1951

Bill Roper

Position:
Coach
Schools
Princeton University, 1906 to 1908
Princeton University, 1920 to 1930
Swarthmore College, 1915 to 1916
Princeton University, 1910 to 1911
Virginia Military Institute, 1903 to 1904
University of Missouri, 1909 to 1909
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Birth:
August 22/1880
Place of Death:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Death:
December 10/1933
Wins:
112
Losses:
37
Ties:
19
Winning percentage:
0.723

Biography

Bill Roper was not an innovative genius or master of detail. He took his best plays from other coaches, often made spontaneous decisions on the sideline and, invariably, proved the master of come-from-behind victory and remarkable upset. He was a member of Princeton's 1899 National Championship team and began his coaching career at Virginia Military (1903-1904) before returning to his alma mater (1906-1908), leaving Princeton for Missouri (1909), then going back to Princeton (1910-1911), leaving once again for Swarthmore (1915-1916), and finally returning to Princeton for his third tenure (1919-1930). His 1922 squad, which became known as "The Team of Destiny", beat Chicago, 21-18, after trailing 18-7 in the fourth quarter. Like so many of Roper's other clubs, the 1922 team was, in truth, a so-so gathering of talent - but he pushed them into success. He believed football was 90% fight and 10% execution, strategy and technique. Roper's record for 17 years at Princeton was 89-28-16. His Tiger squads were unbeaten in 1906, 1911, 1920, 1922; they lost one game in five other seasons.

1951

Andy Smith

Coach

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1951

Andy Smith

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of California, 1916 to 1925
Purdue University, 1913 to 1915
University of Pennsylvania, 1909 to 1912
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Du Bois, PA
Date of Birth:
September 10/1883
Place of Death:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Death:
January 8/1926
Wins:
116
Losses:
32
Ties:
13
Winning percentage:
0.761

Biography

They called them the California "Wonder Teams", those Golden Bear elevens which went undefeated for an incredible five-season span, running up a record of 44-0-4. The architect of these magnificent teams was Andrew L. Smith, who had been an All-America fullback on the great Penn team of 1904 which went unbeaten in 12 games. Smith actually began his coaching career at Penn (1909-1912), where he logged a record of 30-10-3. From Penn, Smith moved to Purdue for the 1913 through 1915 seasons, lifting the Boilermakers to a 12-6-3 record. Then, in 1916, Smith came to California and began molding Golden Bear fortunes for an upward surge. The famous Wonder Teams began with the 9-0-0 club of 1920, a team that crushed Washington State (49-0), Stanford (38-0) and Ohio State (28-0) in its final three games. In 1921, the Bears won another nine games before Washington & Jefferson managed a scoreless tie in the Rose Bowl. It was 9-0-0 again in 1922, then 9-0-1 the next year, when Cal allowed only seven points all year long. Finally, the last of the Wonder Teams, the 1924 club, finished 8-0-2. Cal won its first two games of the 1925 campaign before losing to the Olympic Club, 15-0 - snapping a string of 50 consecutive games without a loss.

1951

Walter "Eckie" Eckersall

Quarterback

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1951

Walter "Eckie" Eckersall

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Chicago, 1903 to 1906
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Chicago, IL (Hyde Park HS)
Place of Birth:
Chicago, IL
Date of Birth:
June 17/1886
Place of Death:
Chicago, IL
Date of Death:
March 24/1930
Height:
5'7
Weight:
141

Biography

"The first time I learned a football was not only something to kick, but something to think with, was when I saw a great football player in action for the first time." Those were the words of Knute Rockne, and he spoke of Walter Eckersall. Rockne had seen the great Chicago quarterback playing in a high school all-star game in 1900. Rockne was just a youngster and Eckersall became his hero. Eckersall was the leader on coach Amos Alonzo Stagg's great Chicago teams at the turn of the 20th century. A three-time consensus All-America in a time when few players beyond the east gained recognition, Eckersall was a fast, slippery runner and an exceptional kicker. It was his coffin-corner punts which were credited as the death-blows to Michigan's 56-game winning streak when the Maroons downed the Wolverines, 2-0, in 1905. Several seasons later, after Rockne became the head coach at Notre Dame, Knute discovered Eckersall was slated to referee an Irish game in Chicago. "I've been waiting years for this," Rockne said to Eckersall. "For what?" Eckersall wanted to know. "To shake your hand.", Rockne blurted, quick to relay his memories of that high school all-star game so many years before. "Stop! Stop!", Eckersall interrupted, "Or Notre Dame will be penalized five yards for speech making."

1951

Amos Alonzo "The Grand Old Man of the Midway" Stagg

Coach

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1951

Amos Alonzo "The Grand Old Man of the Midway" Stagg

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Chicago, 1892 to 1932
University of the Pacific, 1933 to 1946
Springfield College, 1890 to 1891
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
West Orange, NJ
Date of Birth:
August 16/1862
Place of Death:
Stockton, CA
Date of Death:
March 17/1965
Wins:
314
Losses:
199
Ties:
35
Winning percentage:
0.605

Biography

Amos Alonzo Stagg is a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, elected as both player and coach in 1951. He was born August 16, 1862, in West Orange, New Jersey and died March 17, 1965, at age 102 in Stockton, California. He played football five years for Yale and was named end on the first All-America team picked in 1889. Stagg served 57 years as head coach at Springfield College 1890-91, Chicago 1892-32, and College of Pacific 1933-46. Stagg won 314 games, a record at the time. He continued as assistant coach with his son, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr., at Susquehanna 1947-52 and as kicking coach at Stockton Junior College 1953-58. Stagg invented the end-around, hidden-ball trick, fake punt, quick-kick, man-in-motion, double reverse, huddle, backfield shift, Statue of Liberty play, padded goal posts, and numbers on players' backs. Knute Rockne said, "All football comes from Stagg." He was a baseball player at Yale and turned down a pro contract. He invented the batting cage for baseball and the trough for overflow in swimming pools.

1951

Jock Sutherland

Coach

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1951

Jock Sutherland

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Pittsburgh, 1924 to 1938
Lafayette College, 1919 to 1923
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Coupar Angus, Scotland
Date of Birth:
March 21/1889
Place of Death:
Pittsburgh, PA
Date of Death:
April 11/1948
Wins:
144
Losses:
28
Ties:
14
Winning percentage:
0.812

Biography

John B. "Jock" Sutherland was the single-wing formation's technician and its most effective practitioner. During a 20-year coaching career at Lafayette (1919-1923) and Pittsburgh (1924-1938), his teams had a combined record of 144-28-14. A dour, unmarried Scotsman, Sutherland was hardly a man of excesses or emotion. His personality mirrored the cold, calculated techniques of his teams. Pop Warner looked at Sutherland's single wing and admitted, "He put more punch into it than any other coach." In 1935, with a sophomore-dominated Pitt team, Sutherland led the Panthers to a 7-1-2 record. The next season, his third-ranked Panthers went 8-1-1 and beat Washington, 21-0, in the Rose Bowl. In 1937, his team went undefeated and won the national crown, then shocked the country by becoming the first team to publicly decline a Rose Bowl invitation. The older players had already played in Pasadena once and wanted their Christmas holiday. Following his collegiate coaching career, Sutherland turned to professional football for two seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers and another two seasons with the Brooklyn Dodgers. His record in the NFL was 28-16-1.