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Inductee Search

College football legends live here. Search below through the database of all College Football Hall of Fame members.

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About the Hall of Fame

  • Located in the heart of Downtown Atlanta, the College Football Hall of Fame and Chick-fil-A Fan Experience showcases the legends of the game within an exciting, entertaining attraction that redefines what a Hall of Fame can be.

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About the Hall of Fame

The $66.5 million facility spans more than 94,000 square feet, housing 30,000 feet of exhibit space and a 45-yard indoor football field that serves as a unique, flexible programming and event space. Adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center, the Georgia Dome and the Omni Hotel, the Hall is just steps from Centennial Olympic Park, the World of Coca-Cola, the Georgia Aquarium, CNN Center, the Imagine It! Children’s Museum, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, as well as numerous dining and hotel options.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  • Members of the National Football Foundation, as well as athletics directors, coaches and members of CoSIDA are responsible for the final vote induction into the Hall of Fame.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  1. FIRST AND FOREMOST, A PLAYER MUST HAVE RECEIVED FIRST-TEAM ALL-AMERICA RECOGNITION BY A SELECTOR RECOGNIZED BY THE NCAA AND UTILIZED TO COMPRISE THEIR CONSENSUS ALL-AMERICA TEAMS.
  2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the NFF\'s Honors Court 10 years after his last year of intercollegiate football played.
  3. While each nominee\'s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post-football record as a citizen is also weighed. He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man. Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.
  4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*. For example, to be eligible for the 2014 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1964 or thereafter. In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.
  5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years old. Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age. He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage*.
* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

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2013

Steve Meilinger

End

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2013

Steve Meilinger

Position:
End
School
University of Kentucky, 1951 to 1953
Jersey Number:
80
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Bethlehelm, PA
Date of Birth:
June 12/1930
Height:
6'1
Weight:
217

Biography

Steve Meilinger gained fame as “Mr. Anywhere” for his versatility and value to the Kentucky football program. The two-time first-team All-America (1952, 1953) selection, under Hall of Fame head coach Bear Bryant, Meilinger led Kentucky to victory in the 1952 Cotton Bowl over TCU. The two-year All-Southeastern Conference honoree played end, halfback and quarterback on offense, while covering end, linebacker and defensive back on defense. He also served as the Wildcats’ two-year starting punter while returning punts and kickoffs. A first round selection by the Washington Redskins in the 1954 NFL Draft, Meilinger played six seasons in the league for the Redskins, Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers. He spent the entirety of his non-football life in military or public service. Immediately following his selection by the Redskins, Meilinger served two years as a tank commander in the U.S. Army’s 100th Tank Battalion of the 1st Armored Division before embarking on his pro football career. From 1962-83, Meilinger was a United States Marshal, and he was one of the original six marshals who founded the U.S. Federal Witness Protection Program. The Bethlehem, Pa., native is a member of the State of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the University of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, the Fork Union Military Academy Hall of Fame, the Lehigh Valley (Penn.) Hall of Fame and the Liberty High School Hall of Fame.

2013

Jerry Gray

Safety

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2013

Jerry Gray

Position:
Safety
School
University of Texas, 1981 to 1984
Jersey Number:
2
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Lubbock, TX
Date of Birth:
December 16/1962
Height:
6'1
Weight:
183

Biography

Defensive back Jerry Gray was instrumental in helping the Texas defense shut down some of the decade’s most high-powered offenses. A two-time First-Team All-American (consensus – 1983, unanimous – 1984), Gray led Texas to four consecutive bowl games, including a 1982 Cotton Bowl victory and a No. 2 final national ranking. He was a two-time Southwest Conference Player of the Year (1983, 1984), and he helped the Longhorns win the 1983 conference title under coach Fred Akers. The two-time team MVP recorded 297 career tackles, 16 interceptions, and 20 pass breakups during his time in Austin. Taken in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams, Gray enjoyed a nine-year career, playing for the Rams, Houston Oilers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers and appearing in four Pro Bowls. Following his playing days, Gray spent time as a position football coach in both the college and professional ranks. The Lubbock, Texas, native established the Jerry Gray Foundation for underprivileged youth, which provides athletic and academic scholarships. He also founded and coordinated the Jerry Gray/Young Life Skills and Leadership Football Camp. Gray became a member of the Longhorn Hall of Honor in 1996.

2013

Joe Micchia

Quarterback

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2013

Joe Micchia

Position:
Quarterback
School
Westminster College (PA), 1987 to 1989
Jersey Number:
10
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Youngstown, PA
Date of Birth:
December 30/1966
Height:
6'0
Weight:
195

Biography

A two-time All-America, Joe Micchia led Westminster to back-to-back undefeated seasons en route to consecutive NAIA Division II national championships. The school’s first-ever 4,000-yard passer holds Titans records for career (68) and season (32) touchdown passes, and he went 31-0 as a starter. A two-time national title game MVP, he led his team to a 27-game winning streak that ranked as the nation’s longest among all divisions at the time. After graduating from Westminster, Micchia completed medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1994, later completing his residency in Columbus, Ohio. He worked at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and at North Raleigh Primary Care before forming a practice in Wake Forest, N.C.

2013

Vinny Testaverde

Quarterback

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2013

Vinny Testaverde

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Miami, 1982 to 1986
Jersey Number:
14
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Brooklyn, NY
Date of Birth:
November 13/1963
Height:
6'5
Weight:
218

Biography

One of the most celebrated players in a Hurricane history, Miami’s Vinny Testaverde claimed virtually every major award during his senior season in 1986. As a senior, Testaverde earned unanimous First-Team All-American honors, and he won the Heisman Trophy, the Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell, Davey O’Brien and UPI Player of the Year awards. He led the Canes to three consecutive bowls, including the 1987 Fiesta Bowl National Championship game. He finished his collegiate career with more than 6,000 passing yards and 48 touchdown passes, and ranked in the top five in virtually every passing category in school history. Testaverde, who was a redshirt on Miami’s 1983 national championship team, went 23-3 as a starter playing for legendary coaches Howard Schnellenberger and Hall of Famer Jimmy Johnson. In 1985, he was a second team All-America and placed fifth in the Heisman voting. Tampa Bay selected Testaverde as the No. 1 overall selection in the 1987 NFL Draft, and his pro career spanned 21 seasons with seven different teams. He was a 1998 All-Pro and two-time Pro Bowl selection.

2013

Don Trull

Quarterback

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2013

Don Trull

Position:
Quarterback
School
Baylor University, 1961 to 1963
Jersey Number:
10
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Oklahoma City, OK
Date of Birth:
November 20/1941
Height:
6'1
Weight:
190

Biography

Passing for more than 4,000 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career, Don Trull left an indelible mark on the Baylor record books while becoming the school’s first-ever NFF National Scholar-Athlete. A 1963 First-Team All-American and First-Team All-Southwest Conference selection, Trull led the nation in touchdowns and passing yards his senior season. He was a two-time winner of the Sammy Baugh Award for leading the country in completions (1962, 1963), and he finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior. Trull became Baylor’s first two-time First-Team Academic All-American honoree in 1962 and 1963 as well as the school’s first NFF National Scholar-Athlete (1963). Trull led the Bears to the 1961 Gotham Bowl and the 1963 Bluebonnet Bowl under coach John Bridges. The Oklahoma City native enjoyed an eight-year career in the professional ranks, playing for the Houston Oilers and Boston Patriots as well as the CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos. Following his playing days, he served as an assistant coach at Arkansas from 1972-74. Trull is a Baylor Hall of Fame inductee, and he was named to the school’s all-decade team.

2013

Ted Brown

Running Back

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2013

Ted Brown

Position:
Running Back
School
North Carolina State University, 1975 to 1978
Jersey Number:
23
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
High Point, NC
Date of Birth:
February 15/1957
Height:
5'10
Weight:
195

Biography

Ted Brown dominated the Atlantic Coast Conference in the late 1970's. Brown left Raleigh as one of the most accomplished rushers in ACC history, holding the league's career records for rushing yards (4,602) and touchdowns (51). The 1978 first-team All-America led N.C. State to three bowl games, including victories in the 1977 Peach Bowl and 1978 Tangerine Bowl, in which he garnered MVP honors. He capped off his senior year by rushing for his third consecutive 1,000-yard season and amassing 27 career 100-yard games. He was the first player in league history to earn First-Team All-ACC distinction all four years and was named the conference’s Rookie of the Year in 1975. Brown played under legendary Hall of Fame Coach Lou Holtz and coach Bo Rein. The High Point, N.C., native was chosen in the first round of the 1979 NFL Draft by the Minnesota Vikings. He spent eight years in the professional ranks, all with the Vikings. He finished his career as the fifth-leading rusher in franchise history (4,546 yards and 53 TDs). Brown was a 1995 inductee into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, and his No. 23 jersey was the first football jersey retired at N.C. State.

2013

Tedy Bruschi

Defensive End

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2013

Tedy Bruschi

Position:
Defensive End
School
University of Arizona, 1992 to 1995
Jersey Number:
68
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
San Francisco, CA
Date of Birth:
June 9/1973
Height:
6'1"
Weight:
253

Biography

One of the most feared defenders of his era as a member of the storied “Desert Swarm” defense, Tedy Bruschi concluded his career at Arizona tied for the NCAA FBS record in career sacks with 52 quarterback takedowns. A two-time All-America (1994 – consensus, 1995 – unanimous), Bruschi’s celebrated senior season included the 1995 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year title and winning the Morris Trophy as the league’s best defensive lineman. He was a two-time finalist for the Lombardi Award and graduated with 74 tackles for loss, which ranked sixth in FBS history. Bruschi was named all-conference three times, and he led the Wildcats to three bowl berths under coach Dick Tomey. The San Francisco native was a third-round selection by the New England Patriots in the 1996 NFL Draft. Bruschi enjoyed a 13-year career, winning three Super Bowls with the franchise. The Pro Bowler was named the Associated Press’ Comeback Player of the Year in 2005 following a stroke. A committed spokesman and advocate for stroke survivors, Bruschi founded Tedy’s Team, in conjunction with the American Stroke Association, which has raised more than $1.5 million. He wrote a book, “Never Give Up: My Stroke, My Recovery, and My Return to the NFL,” detailing his NFL comeback after his own stroke in 2005. Bruschi is also an active participant in the Make-A-Wish Foundation, granting wishes for numerous children through the organization.

2013

Orlando Pace

Offensive Tackle

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2013

Orlando Pace

Position:
Offensive Tackle
School
Ohio State University, 1994 to 1996
Jersey Number:
75
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Sandusky, OH
Date of Birth:
November 4/1975
Height:
6'6
Weight:
330

Biography

Known as the “Pancake Man” for flattening his opponents with his exceptional blocking techniques, Orlando Pace finished fourth in the 1996 Heisman balloting, the highest finish for a lineman since 1980. A two-time unanimous First-Team All-American (1995, 1996), Pace was the first player in history to repeat as the Lombardi Trophy winner, earning the honors as a sophomore and junior. In addition, Pace claimed the 1996 Outland Trophy while leading Ohio State to a share of the Big Ten title. He did not allow a sack during his final two seasons, blocking for Hall of Fame and 1995 Heisman Trophy-winning running back Eddie George. The 1996 Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year started every game of his career, and he led the Buckeyes to three straight bowl appearances under Hall of Fame coach John Cooper. Chosen with the first overall pick by the St. Louis Rams in the 1997 NFL Draft, Pace enjoyed a decorated 13 seasons in the league, culminating with the Rams’ Super Bowl XXXIV Championship in 1999. Pace was named All-Pro five times, and he earned seven Pro Bowl selections.

2013

Jeff Wittman

Fullback

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2013

Jeff Wittman

Position:
Fullback
School
Ithaca College, 1989 to 1992
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Rochester, NY
Date of Birth:
March 4/1971
Height:
6'0
Weight:
210

Biography

A record-breaking fullback, Jeff Wittman led Ithaca to the Division III national title in 1991 and was subsequently named MVP of the Stagg Bowl. A three-time first-team All-American from 1990-92, he broke 16 career rushing and scoring records while leading the Bombers to a 36-8-0 record during his prolific career. The 1993 Ben Light Senior Male Athlete of the Year ran for 100-plus yards in a game 18 times, and he rushed for an Ithaca-record 3,410 yards and 44 touchdowns during his collegiate campaign. After graduation, Wittman returned to his hometown of Rochester, N.Y., to pursue his passion for teaching and coaching.

2013

Danny Wuerffel

Quarterback

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2013

Danny Wuerffel

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Florida, 1993 to 1996
Jersey Number:
7
Inducted:
2013
High School:
Place of Birth:
Pensacola, FL
Date of Birth:
May 27/1974
Height:
6'2
Weight:
209

Biography

The first player in history to win the Heisman as well as the NFF’s William V. Campbell Trophy, Danny Wuerffel dominated the college football landscape both athletically and academically during his senior season. A two-time First-Team All-American, Wuerffel claimed the 1996 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell Award, Davey O’Brien Award, Unitas Golden Arm and the Sammy Baugh Trophy. The two-time SEC Player of the Year and First-Team All-SEC selection posted a 45-6-1 career mark, leading the Gators to the 1996 National Championship. Wuerffel finished his career with nearly 11,000 passing yards and 33 school records, taking Florida to bowl games in each of his four seasons under coach Steve Spurrier. In addition to the 1996 Campbell Trophy, Wuerffel was named a two-time Academic All-American and two-time Scholar-Athlete of the Year. He became the first winner of the Campbell Trophy to enter the College Football Hall of Fame. The Ft. Walton, Fla., native was drafted in the fourth round of the 1997 NFL Draft by New Orleans, and spent six season in the league with the Saints, Packers, Bears and Redskins. Wuerffel became executive director of Desire Street Ministries after Hurricane Katrina, currently leading the organization’s various community outreach activities. He was a presidential appointee to the White House Council for Service and Civic Participation, a member of the Board of Directors for Professional Athletes Outreach; and a national spokesman for Caps Kids. As the quintessential student-athlete and humanitarian, the All Sports Association established the Wuerffel Trophy in 2005, which recognizes a college football player for his exemplary community service.
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

The College Football Hall of Fame is a lasting tribute to the game’s greatest players and coaches.  The legends represented here have reached the highest level of achievement in the sport, and their stories of excellence and impact - on and off the field - endure here in perpetuity.Scroll through to learn more about all of the inductees of the College Football Hall of Fame, or use the search function to find certain players.

1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Coach

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1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Position:
Coach
Schools
Syracuse University, 1906 to 1907
Columbia University, 1920 to 1922
Syracuse University, 1913 to 1919
Colgate University, 1904 to 1905
Colgate University, 1902 to 1902
Inducted:
1951
Alma mater:
Place of Birth:
Syracuse, NY
Date of Birth:
March 6/1875
Place of Death:
Hamilton, NY
Date of Death:
April 21/1958
Wins:
81
Losses:
41
Winning percentage:
0.654

Biography

Frank "Buck" O'Neill played football at Williams College and excelled at track as well as football. He was head coach at Colgate in 1902, again in 1904-05. His teams had an 18-8-2 record there. O'Neill moved to Syracuse and coached there for three terms: 1906-07, 1913-15, and 1917-19. He also maintained a law practice during these years. His eight-year coaching totals at Syracuse were 52-19-6. His best era at Syracuse came from 1915-1918 when the team had a combined 22-3-3 record O'Neill moved to Columbia and in 1920-22 had an 11-14 record. All told, he was a head coach 14 years with a record of 81-41-8. O'Neill was named a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

1951

Bennie Owen

Coach

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1951

Bennie Owen

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Oklahoma, 1905 to 1926
Bethany College (KS), 1901 to 1904
Washburn University, 1900 to 1900
Inducted:
1951
Alma mater:
Place of Birth:
Chicago, IL
Date of Birth:
July 24/1875
Place of Death:
Houston, TX
Date of Death:
February 26/1970
Wins:
155
Losses:
60
Winning percentage:
0.703

Biography

Benjamin G. "Bennie" Owen was Fielding Yost's quarterback for the undefeated Kansas team of 1899. The next year he was head coach at Washburn College. Then came years as head coach at Bethany College in Kansas and Oklahoma. In 1907, he lost an arm in a hunting accident. He stayed on the job and carved a career coaching record of 155-60-19 over 27 seasons. He had high scoring teams and was an early exponent of the forward pass. He was known for sportsmanship; his teams were always lectured on fair play. His 1911 team went 8-0 and outscored the enemy 282-15. In 1914 Oklahoma went 9-1-1 and led the nation in scoring with 435 points. Forest Geyer threw 25 touchdown passes that year. The 1915 team went 10-0 and scored 370 points. In 1918, the record was 6-0 and the scoring edge 278-7. Oklahoma won championships in the Southwest Conference in 1915 and 1918 and the Missouri Valley Conference in 1920. Owen served as director of athletics 1927-34. Owen Field, where Oklahoma plays its home games, is named for him. He was born July 24, 1875 in Chicago; he died February 26, 1970, in Houston at age 94. He was a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, elected in 1951.

1951

George "The Gipper" Gipp

Halfback

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1951

George "The Gipper" Gipp

Position:
Halfback
School
University of Notre Dame, 1917 to 1920
Jersey Number:
66
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Place of Birth:
Laurium, MI
Date of Birth:
February 18/1895
Place of Death:
South Bend, IN
Date of Death:
December 14/1920
Height:
6'1
Weight:
180

Biography

The "Win one for The Gipper!" pep talk is one of college footballs most famous half time speeches. Knute Rockne's words came with a special emotion as he urged his Notre Dame players to remember and respond accordingly. It was not just Rockne's impassioned pleas which had made George Gipp a Notre Dame legend. It was the talents of a free-spirited, untamed athlete scoring touchdown after touchdown and leading Irish teams to a pair of perfect nine-game seasons in his final two years. It was remembering that late afternoon in South Bend's St. Joseph Hospital when the failing Gipp, losing the battle with pneumonia, slipped through death's door. "I gotta go, Rock," Gipp had said. "Someday, Rock, when the team is up against it, when things are going bad and breaks are beating the boys - tell them to go on in there with all they've got and win just one for The Gipper. I don't know where I'll be then, Rock, but I'll know about it, and I'll be happy." December 14, 1920; George Gipp, age 25, died. In four varsity years Gipp rushed for 2,341 yards. This was a school record that lasted until 1978. He also completed 93 passes for 1,769 yards, punted, and returned kicks. He scored 156 points, counting touchdowns, extra points, and field goals. The speech Rockne gave using Gipp's plea, was at halftime Nov. 10, 1928, against Army. Notre Dame trailing 6-0, came back to win 12-6.

1951

Bo McMillin

Quarterback

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1951

Bo McMillin

Position:
Quarterback
School
Centre College, 1917 to 1921
Jersey Number:
11
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Place of Birth:
Prairie Hill, TX
Date of Birth:
January 12/1895
Place of Death:
Bloomington, IN
Date of Death:
March 31/1952
Height:
5'9
Weight:
165

Biography

Alvin "Bo" McMillin was the star of the football team at Northside High School, Fort Worth, in 1915. Robert "Chief" Myers, his high school coach, took the best players to Centre college in 1916. McMillin didn't have enough credits for college, so he went another year to high school in Somerset, Kentucky, and played on the football team. He enrolled at Centre and won football letters in five seasons 1917-1921. This was possible because he spent part of 1918 in service and the football season did not count against his college eligibility. He drop-kicked a 17-yard field goal to beat Kentucky in 1917. He had a 35-yard run to beat Harvard 6-0 in 1921; it was Harvard's first defeat in five years. The run was one of the most famed touchdown scored in the game's history. Walter Camp named McMillin quarterback on his All-America first team in 1919 and named him to his second-team 1920. McMillan repeated as a consensus All-America in 1921. McMillin was head coach at Centenary 1922-24, Geneva 1925-27, Kansas State 1928-33, and Indiana 1934-47 with a record of 146-77-13. His 1945 team won Indiana's first Big Ten championship. In that year, he was named national Coach of the Year. He coached in the pros with Detroit 1948-50 and Philadelphia 1951.

1951

Sammy "Slingin' Sammy" Baugh

Halfback

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1951

Sammy "Slingin' Sammy" Baugh

Position:
Halfback
School
Texas Christian University, 1934 to 1936
Jersey Number:
45
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Place of Birth:
Temple, TX
Date of Birth:
March 17/1914
Place of Death:
Rotan, TX
Date of Death:
February 17/2008
Height:
6'2
Weight:
180

Biography

Slingin' Sammy Baugh was the first of the great glamour players to give tremendous impetus to the modern passing game. Aided by the slimmer football developed in 1934, Baugh threw 587 passes in his three varsity seasons for 39 touchdowns and nearly two miles in yardage. In an era when ten passes in a game was considered extravagant, Baugh threw as many as 40 passes in some games. Baugh was also an excellent punter, who as a professional would lead the league four times. During a 3-2 TCU victory over LSU in the Sugar Bowl, Baugh punted 14 times for a 48 yard average, placing many kicks inside the Tiger five yard line. Baugh gained first -team All-America status in 1935 and repeated as a consensus All-America in his 1936 senior season. That year he placed fourth in the Heisman vote. On New Year's Day of 1937 Texas Christian played in the first Cotton Bowl defeating Marquette 16-6. As a professional with the Washington Redskins, he played on five division and two league championship teams. As a passer he led the league six times and set many NFL passing records. In addition to being a great passer and punter, Baugh was also a superior defensive player as he led the NFL in interceptions in 1943.

1951

Knute "Rock" Rockne

Coach

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1951

Knute "Rock" Rockne

Position:
Coach
School
University of Notre Dame, 1918 to 1930
Inducted:
1951
Alma mater:
Place of Birth:
Voss, Norway
Date of Birth:
March 4/1888
Place of Death:
Bazaar, KS
Date of Death:
March 31/1931
Wins:
105
Losses:
12
Winning percentage:
0.881

Biography

To answer the debate as to who was college football's greatest coach, the argument must always begin with Notre Dame's Knute Rockne. His .881 winning percentage is the highest in major college football history. He had five undefeated seasons, and six others where he lost just one game. His teams won three national titles and he made Notre Dame a team with a national following. From 1918 to 1930, Rockne's Notre Dame elevens had a 105-12-5 record. Rockne's electric personality and the stylish play of his teams captured public imagination during the "Golden Age" of sports in the Roaring Twenties. He perfected such maneuvers as the Notre Dame Shift and helped change the game from one of brute strength to one of speed and deception. His style of play was adopted by countless teams and six of his players would become Hall of Fame coaches. He coached legendary athletes such as George Gipp, Hunk Anderson, Rip Miller, and of course, the Four Horsemen - Harry Stuhldreher, Jim Crowley, Don Miller and Elmer Layden. Then, on March 31, 1931, America and the world mourned the news - Knute Rockne had died in a plane crash at Bazaar, Kansas at the age of 43. Will Rogers paid this tribute: "Notre Dame was Knute Rockne's address, but every gridiron in America was his home."

1951

Red "The Galloping Ghost" Grange

Halfback

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1951

Red "The Galloping Ghost" Grange

Position:
Halfback
School
University of Illinois, 1923 to 1925
Jersey Number:
77
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Place of Birth:
Forksville, PA
Date of Birth:
June 13/1903
Place of Death:
Lake Wales, FL
Date of Death:
January 28/1991
Height:
5'11
Weight:
175

Biography

Harold "Red" Grange was the miracle man of the 1920s, picked for the all-century team, named the "Galloping Ghost" because no one could catch him. During his time, Grange was to college football what Babe Ruth was to baseball. He was fast, elusive, football's greatest open-field runner up to his time. Here are some dates: October 6, 1923, the Grange makes his debut for Illinois against Nebraska with touchdown runs of 50, 35, 12 yards. October 18, 1924, he scores four touchdowns in the first 12 minutes against Michigan on runs of 95, 67, 56, 44 yards. For the day he carries the ball 21 times for 402 yards. November 8, 1924 he runs for 300 yards, passes for 177 against Chicago. October 31, 1925, Grange runs 36 times, gains 363 yards and has two 65-yard touchdowns against Pennsylvania. He played only 20 games in college but had 31 touchdowns and 3,362 yards. Over his career - high school at Wheaton, Illinois; college at Illinois, pro with the Chicago Bears, he carried the ball 4,103 times, gained 33,920 yards, an average of 8.4 per try. The three-time consensus All-America is still considered as one of the game's greatest players.

1951

Bill Roper

Coach

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1951

Bill Roper

Position:
Coach
Schools
Princeton University, 1906 to 1908
Princeton University, 1920 to 1930
Swarthmore College, 1915 to 1916
Princeton University, 1910 to 1911
Virginia Military Institute, 1903 to 1904
University of Missouri, 1909 to 1909
Inducted:
1951
Alma mater:
Place of Birth:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Birth:
August 22/1880
Place of Death:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Death:
December 10/1933
Wins:
112
Losses:
37
Winning percentage:
0.723

Biography

Bill Roper was not an innovative genius or master of detail. He took his best plays from other coaches, often made spontaneous decisions on the sideline and, invariably, proved the master of come-from-behind victory and remarkable upset. He was a member of Princeton's 1899 National Championship team and began his coaching career at Virginia Military (1903-1904) before returning to his alma mater (1906-1908), leaving Princeton for Missouri (1909), then going back to Princeton (1910-1911), leaving once again for Swarthmore (1915-1916), and finally returning to Princeton for his third tenure (1919-1930). His 1922 squad, which became known as "The Team of Destiny", beat Chicago, 21-18, after trailing 18-7 in the fourth quarter. Like so many of Roper's other clubs, the 1922 team was, in truth, a so-so gathering of talent - but he pushed them into success. He believed football was 90% fight and 10% execution, strategy and technique. Roper's record for 17 years at Princeton was 89-28-16. His Tiger squads were unbeaten in 1906, 1911, 1920, 1922; they lost one game in five other seasons.

1951

Jim "Bright Path" Thorpe

Halfback

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1951

Jim "Bright Path" Thorpe

Position:
Halfback
Schools
Carlisle Indian Institute, 1907 to 1908
Carlisle Indian Institute, 1911 to 1912
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Place of Birth:
Prague, OK
Date of Birth:
May 28/1888
Place of Death:
Lomita, CA
Date of Death:
March 28/1953
Height:
6'1
Weight:
185

Biography

James Francis Thorpe was born May 28, 1888, on a Sac and Fox Reservation at Prague, Oklahoma. He played halfback for the Carlisle Indian School in 1907-08, again in 1911-12. In 44 games he had 53 touchdowns, 421 points. Statistics for 29 of the games show he averaged 8.4 yards in runs from scrimmage. In 1912, he had 29 touchdowns and 224 points, leading the nation. At the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm he won the pentathlon and decathlon. He played pro football 1915-28, major league baseball 1913-19, and witnesses said he excelled in any sport he tried. That included golf, tennis, lacrosse, field hockey, riding, rowing, gymnastics, archery, bowling, darts, billiards, basketball, swimming, boxing, wrestling. The honors piled up: 1950, named greatest athlete of the half-century 1900-49 by Associated Press sports editors; 1951, elected to College Football Hall of Fame; 1951, movie of his life "Jim Thorpe All-American" stars Burt Lancaster; 1957, a town, Jim Thorpe, Pa., named for him; 1963, elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame; 1984, a Jim Thorpe stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service; 1998, Thorpe again was honored with a stamp by the Postal Service. The sports writer Red Smith wrote: "Thorpe was the greatest athlete of his time, maybe of any time in any land."

1951

Andy Smith

Coach

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1951

Andy Smith

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of California, 1916 to 1925
Purdue University, 1913 to 1915
University of Pennsylvania, 1909 to 1912
Inducted:
1951
Alma mater:
Place of Birth:
Du Bois, PA
Date of Birth:
September 10/1883
Place of Death:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Death:
January 8/1926
Wins:
116
Losses:
32
Winning percentage:
0.761

Biography

They called them the California "Wonder Teams", those Golden Bear elevens which went undefeated for an incredible five-season span, running up a record of 44-0-4. The architect of these magnificent teams was Andrew L. Smith, who had been an All-America fullback on the great Penn team of 1904 which went unbeaten in 12 games. Smith actually began his coaching career at Penn (1909-1912), where he logged a record of 30-10-3. From Penn, Smith moved to Purdue for the 1913 through 1915 seasons, lifting the Boilermakers to a 12-6-3 record. Then, in 1916, Smith came to California and began molding Golden Bear fortunes for an upward surge. The famous Wonder Teams began with the 9-0-0 club of 1920, a team that crushed Washington State (49-0), Stanford (38-0) and Ohio State (28-0) in its final three games. In 1921, the Bears won another nine games before Washington & Jefferson managed a scoreless tie in the Rose Bowl. It was 9-0-0 again in 1922, then 9-0-1 the next year, when Cal allowed only seven points all year long. Finally, the last of the Wonder Teams, the 1924 club, finished 8-0-2. Cal won its first two games of the 1925 campaign before losing to the Olympic Club, 15-0 - snapping a string of 50 consecutive games without a loss.