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Inductee Search

College football legends live here. Search below through the database of all College Football Hall of Fame members.

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About the Hall of Fame

  • Located in the heart of Downtown Atlanta, the College Football Hall of Fame and Chick-fil-A Fan Experience showcases the legends of the game within an exciting, entertaining attraction that redefines what a Hall of Fame can be.

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About the Hall of Fame

The $66.5 million facility spans more than 94,000 square feet, housing 30,000 feet of exhibit space and a 45-yard indoor football field that serves as a unique, flexible programming and event space. Adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center, the Georgia Dome and the Omni Hotel, the Hall is just steps from Centennial Olympic Park, the World of Coca-Cola, the Georgia Aquarium, CNN Center, the Imagine It! Children’s Museum, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, as well as numerous dining and hotel options.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  • Members of the National Football Foundation, as well as athletics directors, coaches and members of CoSIDA are responsible for the final vote induction into the Hall of Fame.

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Hall of Fame Criteria

  1. FIRST AND FOREMOST, A PLAYER MUST HAVE RECEIVED FIRST-TEAM ALL-AMERICA RECOGNITION BY A SELECTOR RECOGNIZED BY THE NCAA AND UTILIZED TO COMPRISE THEIR CONSENSUS ALL-AMERICA TEAMS.
  2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the NFF\'s Honors Court 10 years after his last year of intercollegiate football played.
  3. While each nominee\'s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post-football record as a citizen is also weighed. He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man. Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.
  4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*. For example, to be eligible for the 2014 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1964 or thereafter. In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.
  5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years old. Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age. He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage*.
* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

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2015

Bill Snyder

Coach

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2015

Bill Snyder

Position:
Coach
Schools
Kansas State University, 2008 to 2015
Kansas State University, 1989 to 2005
Inducted:
2015
Place of Birth:
Saint Joseph, MO
Date of Birth:
October 7/1939
Wins:
193
Losses:
100
Ties:
1
Winning percentage:

Biography

The “architect of the greatest turnaround in the history of college football,” Bill Snyder became the winningest coach in Kansas State history while continuing to lead the program to national prominence during his career. He became only the fourth coach to earn induction into the College Football Hall of Fame while still actively heading a program, joining Bobby Bowden John Gagliardi and Joe Paterno. The 14th fastest coach in college football history to win 100 games, Snyder has led Kansas State to two Big 12 Championships and 16 of the school’s 18 bowl appearances, including 11-straight from 1993-2003. He is a three-time Big Eight and four-time Big 12 Coach of the Year, and he took home almost every major college football coaching award after the 1998 season, including those presented by Walter Camp and the Associated Press. Leading Kansas State to top 20 finishes 12 times. Snyder is the chairman of the Kansas Mentors Council and the Kansas Leadership Council, and he serves on the boards or councils of many organizations. He has been awarded numerous times for his civic service, including the 2006 Kansas Community Service and Kansan of the Year Award. Snyder began his coaching career in the high school ranks, and he served as an assistant coach at Southern California, North Texas and Iowa before becoming the head coach at Kansas State. He is a member of the Kansas State Athletics, Missouri, Kansas, Austin College and Holiday Bowl Halls of Fame.

2015

Jim "The Senator" Tressel

Coach

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2015

Jim "The Senator" Tressel

Position:
Coach
Schools
Ohio State University, 2001 to 2010
Youngstown State University, 1986 to 2000
Inducted:
2015
Place of Birth:
Mentor, OH
Date of Birth:
December 5/1952
Wins:
241
Losses:
79
Ties:
2
Winning percentage:

Biography

One of the greatest coaches in the history of the state of Ohio, Jim Tressel brought five national titles to the state, becoming the first head coach to win a national title at both levels of Division I college football. Tressel served as head coach at Youngstown State from 1986-2000, leading the Penguins to ten postseason berths in 15 seasons and four FCS national championships in six appearances in the title game. Boasting the most wins of any FCS coach in the 1990s, Tressel led Youngstown State to the 1987 Ohio Valley Conference title, and he was named OVC Coach of the Year. He was also a two-time AFCA National Coach of the Year and the 1994 FCS Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year while with the Penguins. Tressel became the head coach at Ohio State in 2001, and he led the Buckeyes to the BCS National Championship a year later, with subsequent appearances in the championship game following the 2006 and 2007 seasons. He led Ohio State to national rankings every season, including seven finishes in the top five, and at least a share of six Big Ten titles. During his time in Columbus, Ohio, Tressel received the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year, the Bear Bryant Award and FWAA Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year honors. During his career, Tressel coached ten national major award winners, including 2006 Heisman Trophy winner Troy Smith, as well as 73 First Team All-America and 80 first team all-conference selections. The Berea, Ohio, native also coached seven Academic All-American athletes and three NFF National Scholar-Athletes. Tressel was a first team all-conference quarterback at Baldwin-Wallace, where he played for his father, College Football Hall of Fame coach Lee Tressel. A member of the Youngstown State Athletics Hall of Fame, he is also enshrined in the Greater Cleveland Sports and Baldwin-Wallace Athletics Halls of Fame. After his coaching days, Tressel served as a consultant for the Indianapolis Colts and as Vice President of Strategic Engagement for the University of Akron before becoming president at Youngstown State University.

2015

Trev Alberts

Linebacker

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2015

Trev Alberts

Position:
Linebacker
School
University of Nebraska, 1990 to 1993
Jersey Number:
34
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Cedar Falls, IA (Northern University HS)
Place of Birth:
Cedar Falls, IA
Date of Birth:
August 7/1970
Height:
6'4"
Weight:
240

Biography

Trev Alberts became the Cornhuskers’ first Butkus Award winner in 1993 as the top linebacker in the nation. A unanimous first team All-America following his senior season, Alberts was named the Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year and Male Athlete of the Year in 1993. The senior team captain was Nebraska’s all-time career leader in sacks and was tied for the school’s single-season record. A two-time first team all-conference selection, Alberts led Nebraska to at least a share of three conference titles and four bowl appearances, including three-straight Orange Bowl berths. Alberts was named Defensive MVP following Nebraska’s loss in the 1993 Orange Bowl, and he helped the Huskers to an undefeated regular season and the national title game against Florida State at the Orange Bowl his senior year. The Football News Defensive Player of the Year in 1993, he earned Second Team All-America honors as a junior, and he was the Big Eight Defensive Newcomer of the Year in 1990. Excelling off the field, Alberts was named an NFF National Scholar-Athlete and a Academic All-America following his senior season. The three-time academic all-conference selection was also a recipient of the NCAA Today’s Top Eight Award and an NCAA postgraduate scholarship. Alberts was selected with the fifth overall pick in the 1994 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts, spending three seasons with the franchise. The Cedar Falls, Iowa, native had his number retired by Nebraska in 1994, and he is a member of the university’s All-Century Team and the state of Nebraska Football Hall of Fame. After his playing career, Alberts spent time as a college football analyst and a athletics administrator.

2015

Brian "The Boz" Bosworth

Linebacker

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2015

Brian "The Boz" Bosworth

Position:
Linebacker
School
University of Oklahoma, 1984 to 1986
Jersey Number:
44
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Irving, TX (MacArthur HS)
Place of Birth:
Oklahoma City, OK
Date of Birth:
March 9/1965
Height:
6'2"
Weight:
240

Biography

The only two-time recipient of the Butkus Award as the nation’s top linebacker, Brian Bosworth left an indelible mark on college football during his All-America career at Oklahoma. A consensus First Team All-America in 1985 and 1986, Bosworth led Oklahoma to the 1985 National Championship after recording 13 solo tackles against Penn State in the Orange Bowl. Playing for College Football Hall of Fame coach Barry Switzer, he led the Sooners to three straight Orange Bowl appearances, three Big Eight Conference championships and a 31-4-1 overall record during his time in Norman. The three-time all-conference selection set the single-game school record with 22 tackles against Miami (Fla.) in 1986, and he finished fourth in the that year’s Heisman Trophy voting. Bosworth led Oklahoma in tackles all three seasons, and he finished his career with 395 tackles. Bosworth also excelled off the field, graduating early with a degree in communications. He was named to the Academic All-Conference team all three seasons of his career, and he received Academic All-America honors in 1986. Selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the 1987 NFL Supplemental Draft, Bosworth spent three seasons with the Seahawks, and he has worked in acting and real estate since his retirement. Active in the community, he founded a charity called Boz’s Kids, which has provided activities for underprivileged children in Oklahoma. ESPN Films’ 30 For 30: “Brian And The Boz” chronicled Bosworth’s Hall of Fame career.

2015

Bob Breunig

Linebacker

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2015

Bob Breunig

Position:
Linebacker
School
Arizona State University, 1972 to 1974
Jersey Number:
50
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Phoenix, AZ (Alhambra HS)
Place of Birth:
Ingelwood, CA
Date of Birth:
July 4/1953
Height:
6'2"
Weight:
240

Biography

One of the greatest linebackers in Arizona State history, Bob Breunig twice earned WAC Defensive Player of the Year honors during his time in Tempe. A First Team All-America in 1974, Breunig finished his career as Arizona State’s all-time leader in tackles (353) and solo tackles (206). Playing for College Football Hall of Fame coach Frank Kush, the three-time all-conference selection led the Sun Devils to consecutive Fiesta Bowl wins and WAC titles in 1972 and 1973. A two-year team captain, Breunig was named Arizona State’s MVP in 1974, and he appeared in the Coaches All-America Bowl, the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl following his senior season. Selected in the third round of the 1975 NFL Draft by the Dallas Cowboys, Breunig spent ten seasons with the team. A three-time Pro Bowl selection, he led the Cowboys in tackles four seasons, paving the way to three Super Bowl appearances and a win in Super Bowl XII. The recipient of the 1974 Dick Butkus Silver Anniversary Award in 1999, Breunig is a member of the ASU Sports Hall of Fame and ASU Football Ring of Honor. A member of the All-Time WAC Football Team, he has served on multiple charitable boards, including the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Young Life. In Breunig ran Breunig Commercial, a real estate company in Dallas.

2015

Ruben Brown

Offensive Tackle

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2015

Ruben Brown

Position:
Offensive Tackle
School
University of Pittsburgh, 1991 to 1994
Jersey Number:
78
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Lynchburg, VA (E. C. Glass HS)
Place of Birth:
Englewood, NJ
Date of Birth:
February 13/1972
Height:
6'4"
Weight:
310

Biography

After transitioning from defensive tackle to offensive tackle before his freshman year, Ruben Brown’s outstanding career at Pittsburgh culminated with his selection as a First Team All-America as a senior. Following his All-America campaign in 1994, Brown claimed honors as the Washington D.C. Downtown Athletic Club’s National Outstanding Lineman. The senior team captain was a three-time All-Big East selection, garnering unanimous First Team honors in 1994 and Second Team laurels as a junior and sophomore. Brown appeared in the 1995 Senior Bowl and the 1994 Blue-Gray All-Star Classic. Selected in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft by the Buffalo Bills, Brown spent 11 seasons between the Bills and the Chicago Bears. A nine-time Pro Bowl selection, he was elected to the Bills’ 50th Anniversary Team in 2009, and he was a member of the 2006 Bears team that appeared in Super Bowl XLI. A three-time recipient of the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award, Brown has dedicated himself to community service. In 2001, he established the Ruben Brown Foundation, which raises and distributes funds to youth service and enrichment programs to ensure kids have an opportunity to enhance their personal gifts. Brown has received multiple awards for his work in the community, including the 2003 Salvation Army Community Service Award and 2010 Ralph C. Wilson Distinguished Service Award.

2015

Sean Brewer

Defensive Tackle

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2015

Sean Brewer

Position:
Defensive Tackle
School
Millsaps College, 1989 to 1992
Jersey Number:
60
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Vicksburg, MS (Warren Central HS)
Place of Birth:
Pascagoula, MS
Date of Birth:
June 23/1971
Height:
5'10"
Weight:
235

Biography

The only defensive lineman in Division III history to earn First Team All-America honors three times, Sean Brewer established himself as the most dominant defender in Millsaps history. He becomes the first Major to enter the College Football Hall of Fame. Brewer twice earned Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Defensive Player of the Year honors. He was a First Team All-SCAC selection all four years of his career. When inducted, Brewer’s 435 career tackles ranked fourth in conference history, and he owned the SCAC and school records for solo tackles in a season, racking up 99 in 1992. He also was the Majors' all-time leader in solo tackles (332) and quarterback sacks (52), and ranked second in total tackles with 435. He also set the college’s single-season record with 15 sacks his senior season. In recognition of his outstanding career, the Division III Defensive Lineman of the Year Award was named the Sean Brewer Award in 2013. He is a member of the SCAC’s 15th Anniversary Team, and he earned induction into the Millsaps Hall of Fame in 2004. After receiving his degree in 1993, Brewer went on to a successful career in education. In 2010, he was named the NASSP/Virco Assistant Principal of the Year for the state of Mississippi.

2015

Wes Chandler

Wide Receiver

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2015

Wes Chandler

Position:
Wide Receiver
School
University of Florida, 1974 to 1977
Jersey Number:
89
Inducted:
2015
High School:
New Smyrna Beach, FL (New Smyrna Beach HS)
Place of Birth:
New Smyrna Beach, FL
Date of Birth:
August 21/1956
Height:
6'0"
Weight:
194

Biography

One of the greatest pass receivers in Florida history, Wes Chandler amassed a Hall of Fame career while rewriting the Florida record books. A First Team All-America following his senior season, Chandler finished tenth in the 1977 Heisman Trophy voting after leading Florida in receiving for three straight seasons. The senior team captain was a two-time First Team All-SEC selection, and he led the Gators to three consecutive bowl berths, including the 1974 Sugar Bowl. Ending his career as the highest scoring non-kicker in Florida history with 172 points, Chandler caught 92 passes for 1,963 yards and a then school-record 22 touchdowns. A star for College Football Hall of Fame coach Doug Dickey, he appeared in the 1978 Senior Bowl and East-West Shrine Game. A 1977 First Team Academic All-America and member of the SEC Honor Roll, Chandler was the recipient of Florida’s Fergie Ferguson Award, which is presented to the senior who displays outstanding leadership, character and courage. Taken in the first round of the 1978 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints, Chandler spent 11 seasons in the pros with the Saints, San Diego Chargers and San Francisco 49ers. The four-time Pro Bowl selection was named the NFL Wide Receiver of the Year in 1982, and he is a member of the San Diego Chargers Hall of Fame and 50th Anniversary Team. After his playing career, the New Smyrna Beach, Fla., native coached in NFL Europe and the NFL, as well as at Central Florida and California. Active in the community, he founded the Wes Chandler Youth Foundation in 1982 to help local children in Daytona Beach, Fla., with academics, business acumen and discipline in sports. Chandler is a member of the University of Florida, Florida-Georgia and the Florida High School Athletic Association halls of fame.

2015

Thom Gatewood

Wide Receiver

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2015

Thom Gatewood

Position:
Wide Receiver
School
University of Notre Dame, 1969 to 1971
Jersey Number:
44
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Baltimore, MD (Baltimore City College HS)
Place of Birth:
Baltimore, MD
Date of Birth:
March 7/1951
Height:
6'2"
Weight:
208

Biography

Thom Gatewood set almost every receiving record in school history during an All-American career. A consensus First Team All-American in 1970, Gatewood led Notre Dame in receiving all three varsity seasons. He owned multiple Irish receiving records for more than 30 years, including single-season (77) and career receptions (157), single-season (1,123) and career (2,283) receiving yards and career receiving touchdowns (21). During his career, Gatewood led Notre Dame to an impressive 26-5-1 record and back-to-back Cotton Bowls, including a win in the 1971 edition against Texas. Academically, Gatewood excelled as an NFF National Scholar-Athlete in 1971 and a two-time Academic All-American. Gatewood spent two seasons in the NFL after being selected by the New York Giants in the fifth round of the 1972 draft. A member of the Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame, he went on to serve as director and stage manager for ABC News and ABC Sports, receiving both an Emmy and Peabody Award for his work. Gatewood served on the advisory board for the “Healthy Children, Healthy Futures” initiative, which helps set ground work for fitness and nutrition in inner city communities. He became the owner and president of the advertising specialty and television production company.

2015

Dick Jauron

Running Back

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2015

Dick Jauron

Position:
Running Back
School
Yale University, 1970 to 1972
Jersey Number:
40
Inducted:
2015
High School:
Swampscott, MA (Swampscott HS)
Place of Birth:
Peoria, IL
Date of Birth:
October 7/1950
Height:
6'0"
Weight:
190

Biography

One of the greatest running backs in Ivy League history, Dick Jauron received the Asa S. Bushnell Cup as the league’s Player of the Year in 1972. A First Team All-America following his senior year, Jauron was a First Team All-Ivy League selection all three years of his career. Yale’s team MVP in 1972, he led the Bulldogs in rushing all three seasons and his 2,947 career rushing yards remained a school record until 2000. Playing under College Football Hall of Fame coach Carm Cozza, Jauron also set school records for consecutive 100-yard rushing games with five and career 100-yard rushing games with 16. Named the Outstanding Player in New England in 1972, he also received the Nils V. “Swede” Nelson Award for sportsmanship as a junior, and he played in the 1973 East-West Shrine Game. Jauron also excelled in the classroom and was named an NFF National Scholar-Athlete in 1972. Taken in the fourth round of the 1973 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions, Jauron spent five seasons with the Lions and three with the Cincinnati Bengals. He was named to the 1974 Pro Bowl in his second season after leading the NFC in punt return average. After his playing career, he turned to coaching, spending 28 seasons in the NFL as a defensive backs coach, defensive coordinator or head coach. Jauron served as head coach of the Chicago Bears, where he was named AP Coach of the Year in 2001, and the Buffalo Bills.
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

The College Football Hall of Fame is a lasting tribute to the game’s greatest players and coaches.  The legends represented here have reached the highest level of achievement in the sport, and their stories of excellence and impact - on and off the field - endure here in perpetuity.Scroll through to learn more about all of the inductees of the College Football Hall of Fame, or use the search function to find certain players.

1951

Amos Alonzo "The Grand Old Man of the Midway" Stagg

Coach

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1951

Amos Alonzo "The Grand Old Man of the Midway" Stagg

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Chicago, 1892 to 1932
University of the Pacific, 1933 to 1946
Springfield College, 1890 to 1891
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
West Orange, NJ
Date of Birth:
August 16/1862
Place of Death:
Stockton, CA
Date of Death:
March 17/1965
Wins:
314
Losses:
199
Ties:
35
Winning percentage:
0.605

Biography

Amos Alonzo Stagg is a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, elected as both player and coach in 1951. He was born August 16, 1862, in West Orange, New Jersey and died March 17, 1965, at age 102 in Stockton, California. He played football five years for Yale and was named end on the first All-America team picked in 1889. Stagg served 57 years as head coach at Springfield College 1890-91, Chicago 1892-32, and College of Pacific 1933-46. Stagg won 314 games, a record at the time. He continued as assistant coach with his son, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr., at Susquehanna 1947-52 and as kicking coach at Stockton Junior College 1953-58. Stagg invented the end-around, hidden-ball trick, fake punt, quick-kick, man-in-motion, double reverse, huddle, backfield shift, Statue of Liberty play, padded goal posts, and numbers on players' backs. Knute Rockne said, "All football comes from Stagg." He was a baseball player at Yale and turned down a pro contract. He invented the batting cage for baseball and the trough for overflow in swimming pools.

1951

Walter "Eckie" Eckersall

Quarterback

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1951

Walter "Eckie" Eckersall

Position:
Quarterback
School
University of Chicago, 1903 to 1906
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Chicago, IL (Hyde Park HS)
Place of Birth:
Chicago, IL
Date of Birth:
June 17/1886
Place of Death:
Chicago, IL
Date of Death:
March 24/1930
Height:
5'7
Weight:
141

Biography

"The first time I learned a football was not only something to kick, but something to think with, was when I saw a great football player in action for the first time." Those were the words of Knute Rockne, and he spoke of Walter Eckersall. Rockne had seen the great Chicago quarterback playing in a high school all-star game in 1900. Rockne was just a youngster and Eckersall became his hero. Eckersall was the leader on coach Amos Alonzo Stagg's great Chicago teams at the turn of the 20th century. A three-time consensus All-America in a time when few players beyond the east gained recognition, Eckersall was a fast, slippery runner and an exceptional kicker. It was his coffin-corner punts which were credited as the death-blows to Michigan's 56-game winning streak when the Maroons downed the Wolverines, 2-0, in 1905. Several seasons later, after Rockne became the head coach at Notre Dame, Knute discovered Eckersall was slated to referee an Irish game in Chicago. "I've been waiting years for this," Rockne said to Eckersall. "For what?" Eckersall wanted to know. "To shake your hand.", Rockne blurted, quick to relay his memories of that high school all-star game so many years before. "Stop! Stop!", Eckersall interrupted, "Or Notre Dame will be penalized five yards for speech making."

1951

Jock Sutherland

Coach

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1951

Jock Sutherland

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Pittsburgh, 1924 to 1938
Lafayette College, 1919 to 1923
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Coupar Angus, Scotland
Date of Birth:
March 21/1889
Place of Death:
Pittsburgh, PA
Date of Death:
April 11/1948
Wins:
144
Losses:
28
Ties:
14
Winning percentage:
0.812

Biography

John B. "Jock" Sutherland was the single-wing formation's technician and its most effective practitioner. During a 20-year coaching career at Lafayette (1919-1923) and Pittsburgh (1924-1938), his teams had a combined record of 144-28-14. A dour, unmarried Scotsman, Sutherland was hardly a man of excesses or emotion. His personality mirrored the cold, calculated techniques of his teams. Pop Warner looked at Sutherland's single wing and admitted, "He put more punch into it than any other coach." In 1935, with a sophomore-dominated Pitt team, Sutherland led the Panthers to a 7-1-2 record. The next season, his third-ranked Panthers went 8-1-1 and beat Washington, 21-0, in the Rose Bowl. In 1937, his team went undefeated and won the national crown, then shocked the country by becoming the first team to publicly decline a Rose Bowl invitation. The older players had already played in Pasadena once and wanted their Christmas holiday. Following his collegiate coaching career, Sutherland turned to professional football for two seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers and another two seasons with the Brooklyn Dodgers. His record in the NFL was 28-16-1.

1951

Frank Thomas

Coach

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1951

Frank Thomas

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Alabama, 1931 to 1942
University of Alabama, 1944 to 1946
University of Tennessee-Chattanooga, 1925 to 1928
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Muncie, IN
Date of Birth:
November 15/1898
Place of Death:
Tuscaloosa, AL
Date of Death:
May 10/1954
Wins:
141
Losses:
33
Ties:
9
Winning percentage:
0.795

Biography

Alabama's long line of great coaches did not begin with Paul "Bear Bryant. Frank Thomas played quarterback at Notre Dame 1920-22 and roomed with George Gipp. Knute Rockne called Thomas "his smartest player." He went to Georgia as an assistant coach 1923-24, then worked as head coach at Chattanooga 1925-1928 and Alabama 1931-1942, 1944-1946. (Alabama had no team in 1943). His record at Chattanooga was 26-9-2, at Alabama 108-20-7. Overall, he was 134-29-9, a winning percentage of .805. His Alabama teams were 5-1 in bowl games (Rose, Sugar, Cotton and Orange Bowls). Among the famous Alabama players he coached were Don Hutson, Bear Bryant, Vaughn Mancha, Harry Gilmer, Johnny Cain and Riley Smith. Thomas was a solid coach who claimed material was 60% of the game. The coach's knowledge, ability to impart it to the players, his organization of practices and his personality accounted for the other 40% of the game. "Keep the players high," he insisted, "and make practice a pleasure but not a lark. Be a disciplinarian, but not a slave-driver."

1951

Pop Warner

Coach

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1951

Pop Warner

Position:
Coach
Schools
Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1899 to 1903
Temple University, 1933 to 1938
Stanford University, 1924 to 1932
University of Pittsburgh, 1915 to 1923
Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1907 to 1914
Cornell University, 1904 to 1906
Cornell University, 1897 to 1898
University of Georgia, 1895 to 1896
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Springville, NY
Date of Birth:
April 5/1871
Place of Death:
Palo Alto, CA
Date of Death:
September 7/1954
Wins:
319
Losses:
106
Ties:
32
Winning percentage:
0.733

Biography

Glenn "Pop" Warner helped fashion football in many ways. Consider the facts: he was the first to coach the dummy-scrimmage; he introduced the practice of numbering plays; he was the first to teach the spiral punt and one of the first to advocate the spiral pass; he invented the double-wing formation, with an unbalanced line for more blocking strength. From 1895 through 1938, his teams at Georgia, Cornell, Carlisle, Pittsburgh, Stanford and Temple rolled to a combined record of 319-106-32. He had 47 players selected to the All-America football team, including the legendary Jim Thorpe. He also invented trap blocking, the screen pass, the rolling block, the naked reverse, hidden-ball plays, series plays, the unbalanced line and backfield. All came from Warner's fertile and imaginative mind. He also left another kind of legacy: "You cannot play two kinds of football at once, dirty and good.... You play the way you practice. Practice right...and you will react right." Glenn Scobey Warner enrolled at Cornell University and, as the oldest freshman, was given the nickname "Pop". He played guard on the football team 1892-94. A national network of football leagues for junior players was named for him.

1951

Duke Slater

Tackle

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1951

Duke Slater

Position:
Tackle
School
University of Iowa, 1918 to 1921
Jersey Number:
15
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Clinton, IA (Clinton HS)
Place of Birth:
Normal, IL
Date of Birth:
December 9/1898
Place of Death:
Chicago, IL
Date of Death:
August 14/1966
Height:
6'2
Weight:
207

Biography

Fred "Duke" Slater was born the son of a minister in Normal, Iowa. In 1913, he told his father he wanted to quit high school and get a job. His father got him a job cutting ice in sub-zero weather on the Mississippi River. The boy changed his mind about the job and went back to school. This led him to the University of Iowa, where he played tackle on the football team four years, 1918-21, and threw the shot and discus on the track team. He gained All-America mention for the second time after the 1921 season, in which Iowa had a 7-0 record and beat Notre Dame 10-7 in a classic match. He made all-conference all three years and was one of the first African-Americans to become a star in major college football. Slater played pro football with the Chicago Cardinals until 1931. In the off-season he returned to the University of Iowa and obtained a law degree. He was one of five starters on the 1921 Iowa team who became lawyers. Slater moved to Chicago and served as a Superior Court judge. He was named to the College Football Hall of Fame's first class in 1951.

1951

Eddie "Ned" Mahan

Fullback

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1951

Eddie "Ned" Mahan

Position:
Fullback
School
Harvard University, 1913 to 1915
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Natick, MA (Natick HS)
Place of Birth:
Natick, MA
Date of Birth:
January 19/1892
Place of Death:
Natick, MA
Date of Death:
July 22/1975
Height:
5'11
Weight:
171

Biography

The day was November 20, 1915. Harvard Stadium was alive with excitement as the Crimson prepared to take on Yale, and a little fellow with a marvelous gift for open-field running was about to electrify the crowd in one of the greatest individual performances of the game's early history. Harvard's 171-pound fullback, Eddie Mahan, dazzled the Bulldog defense, scoring four touchdowns and kicking five conversion points as the Crimson handed Yale its' worst defeat in the first 44 years of football at the school, 41-0. Mahan was the senior captain at Harvard that season and his all-around efforts in running, kicking, passing, punting, blocking and tackling earned him a third straight year at the top of the consensus All-America listing. A marvel at evading tacklers, Mahan later explained his patented escapes, saying: "I simply give them the foot - right or left - and then take it away." The star of coach Percy Haughton's successful era at Harvard, Mahan helped Harvard compile a record of 24-1-2.

1951

Henry Williams

Coach

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1951

Henry Williams

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Minnesota, 1901 to 1921
United States Military Academy, 1891 to 1891
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Hartford, CT
Date of Birth:
July 26/1869
Place of Death:
Minneapolis, MN
Date of Death:
June 14/1931
Wins:
141
Losses:
34
Ties:
12
Winning percentage:
0.786

Biography

Henry Williams was the inventor of the famous tackle-back offense. In 1891, he used it to give Army its first-ever victory over archival Navy. This was an era when you were not required to have seven men on the line of scrimmage. Williams moved his tackles into the backfield for added blocking at the point of attack. Williams was a teacher at Siglar Academy in Newburgh, New York, ten miles north of West Point, when he began making twice-weekly trips to the Army campus in order to coach the Cadet varsity. His tackle-back offense was to pay off in huge fashion. Williams later enrolled in Penn's School of Medicine, paying his way while acting as football and track coach at William Penn Charter School. He then moved to Minnesota and began building outstanding Gopher teams, including his own Minnesota shift, the fore-runner of the Notre Dame shift made famous by Knute Rockne. Williams played football at Yale 1887-1890. He was on a team with Amos Alonzo Stagg, Bum McClung, Pa Corbin and Pudge Heffelfinger, all of whom made the Hall of Fame as players. He coached Army in 1891 with a 4-1-1 record, coached a prep school, Penn Charter, 1892-99, and coached Minnesota 1900-1921. His Minnesota record was 137-33-11. In his first 16 years Minnesota won eight conference championships. The teams of 1903-1905 had a 35 game unbeaten streak. The 1903 team was 14-0-1 and outscored opponents 618-12. The 1904 team went 13-0 and outscored opponents 725-12. While at Yale, Williams also was on the track team and set a world record in the 120-yard high hurdles. At Minnesota he served as director of athletics and instructor in the medical school. After he left coaching following the 1921 season, he practiced medicine full-time. He is a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

1951

Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost

Coach

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1951

Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Michigan, 1901 to 1923
University of Michigan, 1925 to 1926
San Jose State University, 1900 to 1900
Stanford University, 1900 to 1900
University of Kansas, 1899 to 1899
University of Nebraska, 1898 to 1898
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1897 to 1897
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Fairview, WV
Date of Birth:
April 30/1871
Place of Death:
Ann Arbor, MI
Date of Death:
August 20/1946
Wins:
198
Losses:
35
Ties:
12
Winning percentage:
0.832

Biography

Fielding Yost assembled the most devastating teams in the history of football, the famed "Point-A-Minute" teams at the University of Michigan in the early 1900s. In 25 years at the Wolverine helm, "Hurry-Up" compiled a 162-29-10 record. Yost began his coaching career at Ohio Wesleyan in 1897, served one-season terms at Nebraska, Kansas, and Stanford and led San Jose State for one game in 1900. It is there he recruited the great Willie Heston to attend Michigan. He took the Michigan reins in 1901, and promptly launched an incredible success story. In his first season at Ann Arbor, the Wolverines finished 11-0-0 and defeated Stanford, 49-0, in the inaugural Rose Bowl game. Not a single opponent scored upon Michigan that season. His teams - offensively brilliant, defensively unmatched - continued to dominate the game for the next four years. Michigan won 44 games, lost only to Chicago, 2-0, in 1905, and tied Minnesota, 6-6, in 1903. Through those five years (1901-1905), Michigan was 55-1-1, outscoring the opposition, 2821-42. In addition to Heston his stars included the first great passing combination of Bennie Friedman to Benny Oosterbaan. He won ten Big Ten titles and had 20 seasons where his team lost one game of fewer.

1951

Bob "The Little Dutchman" Zuppke

Coach

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1951

Bob "The Little Dutchman" Zuppke

Position:
Coach
School
University of Illinois, 1913 to 1941
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Berlin, Germany
Date of Birth:
July 2/1879
Place of Death:
Champaign, IL
Date of Death:
December 22/1957
Wins:
131
Losses:
81
Ties:
13
Winning percentage:
0.611

Biography

The creative mind of Bob Zuppke gave more to the game of football than most could ever hope to donate. As Illinois coach from 1913 through 1941, Zuppke was the innovator of "pocket" and "screen" passing, "strategy maps" for quarterbacks, and was the first coach to use the 5-4-2 defense. His Fighting Illini rolled to a 131-81-13 record on the way to seven conference championships and two runner-up finishes. Born in Berlin, Germany, in 1879, Zuppke was two years old when his family moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was still coaching at Illinois 60 years later. During the Zuppke years, Illinois' per-game attendance rose from 4,500 to 60,000. Zuppke's record his first 17 seasons was 90-29-9. He won national titles in 1923 and 1927. He did no recruiting, and losing years followed. He gave witty speeches, and his philosophical remarks were called Zuppkeisms. These are the seven best known Zuppkeisms: 1, never let hope elude you; that is life's biggest failure; 2, the greatest athlete is one who can carry a nimble brain to the place of action; 3, moral courage is the result of respect from fellow men; 4, a good back should keep his feet at all times and never lose his head; 5, men do their best if they know they are being observed; 6, alumni are loyal if a coach wins all his games; 7, advice to freshmen: don't drink the liniment.