Close X

Inductee Search

College football legends live here. Search below through the database of all College Football Hall of Fame members.

Close X

About the Hall of Fame

  • Located in the heart of Downtown Atlanta, the College Football Hall of Fame and Chick-fil-A Fan Experience showcases the legends of the game within an exciting, entertaining attraction that redefines what a Hall of Fame can be.

Learn More

About the Hall of Fame

The $66.5 million facility spans more than 94,000 square feet, housing 30,000 feet of exhibit space and a 45-yard indoor football field that serves as a unique, flexible programming and event space. Adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center, the Georgia Dome and the Omni Hotel, the Hall is just steps from Centennial Olympic Park, the World of Coca-Cola, the Georgia Aquarium, CNN Center, the Imagine It! Children’s Museum, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, as well as numerous dining and hotel options.

<< Back

Hall of Fame Criteria

  • Members of the National Football Foundation, as well as athletics directors, coaches and members of CoSIDA are responsible for the final vote induction into the Hall of Fame.

Learn More

Hall of Fame Criteria

  1. FIRST AND FOREMOST, A PLAYER MUST HAVE RECEIVED FIRST-TEAM ALL-AMERICA RECOGNITION BY A SELECTOR RECOGNIZED BY THE NCAA AND UTILIZED TO COMPRISE THEIR CONSENSUS ALL-AMERICA TEAMS.
  2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the NFF\'s Honors Court 10 years after his last year of intercollegiate football played.
  3. While each nominee\'s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post-football record as a citizen is also weighed. He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man. Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.
  4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*. For example, to be eligible for the 2014 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1964 or thereafter. In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.
  5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years old. Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age. He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage*.
* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

<< Back

2014

Mike Bellotti

Coach

Close X

2014

Mike Bellotti

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Oregon, 1995 to 2008
California State University, Chico, 1984 to 1988
Inducted:
2014
Place of Birth:
Sacramento, CA
Date of Birth:
December 21/1950
Wins:
137
Losses:
80
Ties:
2
Winning percentage:

Biography

Mike Bellotti played for and then coached alongside Hall of Fame coach Jim Sochor at California-Davis. This experience gave him a great background in offensive football. In 1989, he became the offensive coordinator at Oregon. In the previous 25 seasons, the Ducks only had five wining seasons. From there Mike Bellotti created a Hall of Fame career, turning the Ducks into a national powerhouse. Mike was named the Ducks head coach in 1995, becoming the first coach in school history to post a winning record in each of his first nine seasons. He took the Ducks to 12 bowl games in 14 seasons, including a win in the Fiesta Bowl following the 2001 season. The Fiesta Bowl victory gave Bellotti and the Ducks a single-season school-record 11 wins and a No. 2 national ranking. Nationally ranked in eight seasons, Bellotti’s Ducks claimed the Pac-10 championship in 2001 and a share of the conference title in 2000. He also served as the head coach at Chico State where he won conference Coach of the Year honors in 1986.

2014

Jerry Moore

Close X

2014

Jerry Moore

Position:
Schools
Appalachian State University, 1989 to 2012
Texas Tech University, 1981 to 1985
University of North Texas, 1979 to 1980
Inducted:
2014
Place of Birth:
Bonham, TX
Date of Birth:
July 18/1939
Wins:
242
Losses:
135
Ties:
2
Winning percentage:

Biography

Jerry Moore is easily one of the most successful FCS coaches in history, winning three consecutive national titles, making 18 playoff appearances, and wining ten league championships. Moore started his football career as an assistant to 2 Hall of Famers, Hayden Fry and Tom Osborne. He got his first head coaching job at North Texas, and then took the Texas Tech job in 1981. Moore moved to Appalachian State in 1989, and he finished his impressive career there with 242 victories en route to becoming the 16th-winningest coach in Division I (FBS and FCS) history. Moore became the only coach to win back-to-back AFCA National Coach of the Year. Moore claimed Southern Conference Coach of the Year honors eight times, and led the Mountaineers to one of the most memorable upsets in college football history, topping No. 5 Michigan at the start of the 2007 season. The win earned Appalachian State the distinction as the first FCS team to ever top a nationally-ranked FBS opponent. This signature victory helped them become the first FCS team in history to receive votes in the final AP poll.

2014

Dre' Bly

Cornerback

Close X

2014

Dre' Bly

Position:
Cornerback
School
University of North Carolina, 1996 to 1998
Jersey Number:
31
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Chesapeake, VA (Western Branch HS)
Place of Birth:
Chesapeake, VA
Date of Birth:
May 22/1977
Height:
5'11"
Weight:
195

Biography

Dre’ Bly was an immediate sensation at cornerback for North Carolina. In his freshman season he led the nation with 11 interceptions and was a consensus All-America selection. The Tar Heels went 10-2 and were ranked tenth nationally. In a bowl win, Bly added two more picks. As a sophomore, teams knew to avoid his side of the field and his interception total fell to five. Yet, Bly was once again a consensus All-America selection as UNC finished 11-1, winning the Gator Bowl and finishing the year as the nation’s fourth ranked team. While the squad had a subpar record in his final season, Bly was recognized as a first-team All-America for the third consecutive year. He was all-conference all three seasons as well, and finished his career with 102 tackles, 27 pass breakups and 20 interceptions. Drafted in the second round of the 1999 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams, Bly spent 11 years in the professional ranks. The All-Pro honoree and two-time Pro Bowl selection helped the Rams win Super Bowl XXXIV his rookie season. In retirement, he co-founded an athletic complex, running youth football and baseball organizations.

2014

Tony Boselli

Offensive Tackle

Close X

2014

Tony Boselli

Position:
Offensive Tackle
School
University of Southern California, 1991 to 1994
Jersey Number:
71
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Boulder, CO (Fairview HS)
Place of Birth:
Modesto, CA
Date of Birth:
April 17/1972
Height:
6'8"
Weight:
305

Biography

Tony Boselli grew up in Boulder, Colorado during an era when the home-town Buffaloes won the National Championship. Yet, when it came to choosing a college he picked Southern California. As an all-conference freshman, the Trojans went 3-8. He repeated on the all-conference team as a sophomore and was recognized as a first-team All-America. With Boselli leading the way, the Trojans finished in a three-way tie for the conference title in his 1993 junior year. Tony closed his career with consensus All-America honors as well as being named the top lineman in the conference. At the conclusion of the year, he was recognized by the National Football Foundation as a scholar-athlete. The first-ever draft pick of the Jacksonville Jaguars, Boselli was selected second overall in 1995. The five-time Pro Bowl selection played seven seasons with the Jaguars before finishing his career with the Houston Texans in 2002. He established the Boselli Foundation in 1995 to work with at-risk youth and help them to cultivate high self-esteem and to succeed at home, at school and at play.

2014

Dave Butz

Defensive Tackle

Close X

2014

Dave Butz

Position:
Defensive Tackle
School
Purdue University, 1970 to 1972
Jersey Number:
62
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Park Ridge, IL (Maine South HS)
Place of Birth:
Lafayette, AL
Date of Birth:
June 23/1950
Height:
6'7"
Weight:
280

Biography

While the Boilermakers during Dave Butz’s career only had one winning season, the consensus All-America lineman gained widespread acclaim. Butz was a versatile high school athlete who was also widely recruited to play basketball, and even received a scholarship offer from famed Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp. College football coaching greats also recognized his abilities as Michigan’s Bo Schembechler called Dave, “the greatest defensive lineman I had ever seen.” For his career, Butz registered 108 tackles, 21 tackles for loss, and eight pass breakups. The senior team captain participated in the East-West Shrine Game and the Senior Bowl, where he was named Defensive MVP. Drafted fifth overall in the 1973 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Cardinals, Butz played 14 of his 16 seasons with the Washington Redskins, leading them to victory in Super Bowls XVII and XXII. The NFL’s “ironman,” he missed only four games his entire career. He retired in 1989 having played in more games than any other Redskin in team history. In retirement, he is involved in many charitable and philanthropic efforts.

2014

Shane Conlan

Linebacker

Close X

2014

Shane Conlan

Position:
Linebacker
School
Pennsylvania State University, 1983 to 1986
Jersey Number:
31
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Frewsburg, NY (Frewsburg Central HS)
Place of Birth:
Frewsburg, NY
Date of Birth:
March 4/1964
Height:
6'3"
Weight:
225

Biography

Penn State linebacker, Shane Conlan wrapped up his career by winning one of college football’s most-remembered games. The 1987 Fiesta Bowl was a national championship contest between second-ranked Penn State and top-ranked Miami. The Hurricanes came into the contest averaging 38 points per game but were held to just ten points as the Nittany Lions won the national title. That senior year, Conlan was a consensus All-America selection. Conlan was lightly recruited out of high school and nearly pursued a career in baseball. He became a starter as a freshman and by the time he was a junior had become a first-team All-America. That year PSU went 11-1 and lost a national title clash with Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl. He finished his career ranked second on the Lions’ career tackles list with 274, and his 183 solo tackles still rank third in school history. Selected eighth overall by the Buffalo Bills in the 1987 NFL Draft, Conlan played six seasons with the Bills and three for the Rams before retiring after the 1995 season. Conlan was the 1987 Rookie of the Year, as well as a three-time Pro Bowl and All-Pro selection. He played in three straight Super Bowls with the Bills, and he was named to their 50th Anniversary team.

2014

Joe Hamilton

Quarterback

Close X

2014

Joe Hamilton

Position:
Quarterback
School
Georgia Tech, 1996 to 1999
Jersey Number:
14
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Alvin, SC (Macedonia HS)
Place of Birth:
Alvin, SC
Date of Birth:
March 13/1977
Height:
5'10"
Weight:
189

Biography

Georgia Tech quarterback Joe Hamilton was an outstanding playmaker for the Yellow Jackets. In his senior year, he was second nationally in both total offense and passing efficiency. As such, he was the nation’s top quarterback that season. He was a consensus All-America and won the Davey O’Brien trophy as the best player at his position. Joe was also the Heisman runner up. Hamilton was a four-year starter who led his team to three Top 25 finishes. As a junior, the Jackets were ranked #9 and captured the Atlantic Coast Conference title. He ended his career as the ACC’s leader in total offense (10,640 yards) and pass efficiency (148.2) and still ranks second in both categories. Selected in the seventh round of the 2000 NFL Draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Hamilton spent two seasons with the Bucs and one with the Indianapolis Colts. Hamilton also played for the Orlando Predators of the Arena Football League for three seasons, posting a 32-15 record as the starting quarterback.

2014

John Huard

Linebacker

Close X

2014

John Huard

Position:
Linebacker
School
University of Maine, 1964 to 1966
Jersey Number:
32
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Waterville, ME (Waterville HS)
Place of Birth:
Waterville, ME
Date of Birth:
March 9/1945
Height:
Weight:

Biography

In his very first varsity game, Maine linebacker John Huard had a 22-tackle day. As a junior and senior, he was a small college first-team All-America. Huard has been ranked as one of the greatest players in Maine history. The Black Bears won the conference title in his sophomore and junior years and closed the 1965 season with a trip to the Tangerine Bowl. Chosen by the Denver Broncos in the fifth round of the 1967 NFL Draft, Huard played four seasons with the Broncos and New Orleans Saints. Huard became the head coach at Acadia University, leading the Axemen to Canadian National Championships in 1979 and 1981, before stints with Maine Maritime Academy and the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League. An active participant with the NFF State of Maine Chapter, Huard also volunteers with the Boys and Girls Club and the Susan Curtis Foundation.

2014

Darrin Nelson

Running Back

Close X

2014

Darrin Nelson

Position:
Running Back
School
Stanford University, 1977 to 1981
Jersey Number:
31
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Downey, CA (Pius X HS)
Place of Birth:
Los Angeles, CA
Date of Birth:
January 1/1959
Height:
5'9"
Weight:
180

Biography

Stanford running back Darrin Nelson was the first player in NCAA history to rush for more than 1,000 yards and catch more than 50 passes in one season. He gained over 1,000 yards as freshman, and was named to the All-Conference team-an honor he received all four of his college years. He was named a second-team All-America as a sophomore. A hamstring injury caused him to miss the 1979 season, but he returned in 1980 and 1981 with his third and fourth 1,000 yard seasons. Nelson was a consensus All-America as a senior placing sixth in the Heisman vote. The Academic All-America was also a National Football Foundation Scholar Athlete. Darrin ended his career as Stanford’s all-time leader in rushing yards (4,033), receptions (214), scoring (242), and touchdowns (40. He finished his career as the NCAA leader for all-purpose yards, which remains a school record at 6,885. Selected in the first round of the 1982 NFL Draft by the Minnesota Vikings, Nelson played 11 seasons with the Vikings and San Diego Chargers. In retirement from the NFL, he became a collegiate athletic administrator.

2014

Willie "Nasty" Roaf

Offensive Tackle

Close X

2014

Willie "Nasty" Roaf

Position:
Offensive Tackle
School
Louisiana Tech University, 1989 to 1992
Jersey Number:
71
Inducted:
2014
High School:
Pine Bluff, AR (Pine Bluff HS)
Place of Birth:
Pine Bluff, AR
Date of Birth:
April 18/1970
Height:
Weight:

Biography

In high school, future Louisiana Tech offensive tackle Willie Roaf was a two-sport star who was also offered basketball scholarships. The mobility he showed on the hardwood helped make Roaf a standout on the gridiron. When he entered Tech he weighed 225 pounds, but quickly grew into his 290-pound frame. Even though Louisiana Tech had just recently moved up to the Division I-A (FBS) level, they more than held their own against SEC schools and teams from other major conferences. Roaf’s sophomore season, Tech tied Maryland in the Independence Bowl and in 1991 went 8-1-2. Willie was named a consensus All-America as a senior and was a finalist for the Outland Trophy. The eighth overall pick by the New Orleans Saints in the 1993 NFL Draft, Roaf enjoyed a highly-decorated 13-year career with the Saints and Kansas City Chiefs, culminating with his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2012. An 11-time Pro Bowl selection, he is a member of the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team. His father went to Michigan State on a football scholarship and became a dentist while his mother made history as the first African-American woman to serve on the Arkansas Supreme Court.
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

The College Football Hall of Fame is a lasting tribute to the game’s greatest players and coaches.  The legends represented here have reached the highest level of achievement in the sport, and their stories of excellence and impact - on and off the field - endure here in perpetuity.Scroll through to learn more about all of the inductees of the College Football Hall of Fame, or use the search function to find certain players.

1951

Andy Kerr

Coach

Close X

1951

Andy Kerr

Position:
Coach
Schools
Colgate University, 1929 to 1946
Lebanon Valley College, 1947 to 1949
Washington & Jefferson College, 1926 to 1928
Stanford University, 1922 to 1923
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Cheyenne, WY
Date of Birth:
October 7/1878
Place of Death:
Tucson, AZ
Date of Death:
March 1/1969
Wins:
137
Losses:
71
Ties:
14
Winning percentage:
0.649

Biography

Andy Kerr became one of the greatest advocates of the lateral pass. He was the first coach to emphasize the downfield lateral, a rugby tactic which was to revolutionize American football offenses. "The public likes razzle-dazzle," he would explain, "but I use laterals mostly as whip-crackers beyond the scrimmage line - not behind it...it serves to keep tacklers off balance." A mathematics teacher, Kerr learned his football as an assistant coach under Pop Warner at Pitt and Stanford and several observers felt Kerr taught the double-wing better than Warner. Kerr went on to a 26-year coaching career, compiling an overall record of 137-71-13 during campaigns at Stanford (1922-1923), Washington & Jefferson (1926-1928), Colgate (1929-1946) and Lebanon Valley (1947-1949). He hit the jackpot at Colgate when his 1932 team finished undefeated, untied, unscored-upon...and uninvited to the Rose Bowl. Kerr served 40 years with the Shrine East-West All-Star game at San Francisco, 23 years as East Coach, 1928-50, and 17 years as chairman of East Player selection Committee, 1951-67

1951

George "The Gipper" Gipp

Halfback

Close X

1951

George "The Gipper" Gipp

Position:
Halfback
School
University of Notre Dame, 1917 to 1920
Jersey Number:
66
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Calumet, MI (Calumet HS)
Place of Birth:
Laurium, MI
Date of Birth:
February 18/1895
Place of Death:
South Bend, IN
Date of Death:
December 14/1920
Height:
6'1
Weight:
180

Biography

The "Win one for The Gipper!" pep talk is one of college footballs most famous half time speeches. Knute Rockne's words came with a special emotion as he urged his Notre Dame players to remember and respond accordingly. It was not just Rockne's impassioned pleas which had made George Gipp a Notre Dame legend. It was the talents of a free-spirited, untamed athlete scoring touchdown after touchdown and leading Irish teams to a pair of perfect nine-game seasons in his final two years. It was remembering that late afternoon in South Bend's St. Joseph Hospital when the failing Gipp, losing the battle with pneumonia, slipped through death's door. "I gotta go, Rock," Gipp had said. "Someday, Rock, when the team is up against it, when things are going bad and breaks are beating the boys - tell them to go on in there with all they've got and win just one for The Gipper. I don't know where I'll be then, Rock, but I'll know about it, and I'll be happy." December 14, 1920; George Gipp, age 25, died. In four varsity years Gipp rushed for 2,341 yards. This was a school record that lasted until 1978. He also completed 93 passes for 1,769 yards, punted, and returned kicks. He scored 156 points, counting touchdowns, extra points, and field goals. The speech Rockne gave using Gipp's plea, was at halftime Nov. 10, 1928, against Army. Notre Dame trailing 6-0, came back to win 12-6.

1951

Bo McMillin

Quarterback

Close X

1951

Bo McMillin

Position:
Quarterback
School
Centre College, 1917 to 1921
Jersey Number:
11
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Fort Worth, TX (Northside HS), Somerset, KY (Somerset HS)
Place of Birth:
Prairie Hill, TX
Date of Birth:
January 12/1895
Place of Death:
Bloomington, IN
Date of Death:
March 31/1952
Height:
5'9
Weight:
165

Biography

Alvin "Bo" McMillin was the star of the football team at Northside High School, Fort Worth, in 1915. Robert "Chief" Myers, his high school coach, took the best players to Centre college in 1916. McMillin didn't have enough credits for college, so he went another year to high school in Somerset, Kentucky, and played on the football team. He enrolled at Centre and won football letters in five seasons 1917-1921. This was possible because he spent part of 1918 in service and the football season did not count against his college eligibility. He drop-kicked a 17-yard field goal to beat Kentucky in 1917. He had a 35-yard run to beat Harvard 6-0 in 1921; it was Harvard's first defeat in five years. The run was one of the most famed touchdown scored in the game's history. Walter Camp named McMillin quarterback on his All-America first team in 1919 and named him to his second-team 1920. McMillan repeated as a consensus All-America in 1921. McMillin was head coach at Centenary 1922-24, Geneva 1925-27, Kansas State 1928-33, and Indiana 1934-47 with a record of 146-77-13. His 1945 team won Indiana's first Big Ten championship. In that year, he was named national Coach of the Year. He coached in the pros with Detroit 1948-50 and Philadelphia 1951.

1951

Sammy "Slingin' Sammy" Baugh

Halfback

Close X

1951

Sammy "Slingin' Sammy" Baugh

Position:
Halfback
School
Texas Christian University, 1934 to 1936
Jersey Number:
45
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Temple, TX (Temple HS), Sweetwater, TX (Sweetwater HS)
Place of Birth:
Temple, TX
Date of Birth:
March 17/1914
Place of Death:
Rotan, TX
Date of Death:
February 17/2008
Height:
6'2
Weight:
180

Biography

Slingin' Sammy Baugh was the first of the great glamour players to give tremendous impetus to the modern passing game. Aided by the slimmer football developed in 1934, Baugh threw 587 passes in his three varsity seasons for 39 touchdowns and nearly two miles in yardage. In an era when ten passes in a game was considered extravagant, Baugh threw as many as 40 passes in some games. Baugh was also an excellent punter, who as a professional would lead the league four times. During a 3-2 TCU victory over LSU in the Sugar Bowl, Baugh punted 14 times for a 48 yard average, placing many kicks inside the Tiger five yard line. Baugh gained first -team All-America status in 1935 and repeated as a consensus All-America in his 1936 senior season. That year he placed fourth in the Heisman vote. On New Year's Day of 1937 Texas Christian played in the first Cotton Bowl defeating Marquette 16-6. As a professional with the Washington Redskins, he played on five division and two league championship teams. As a passer he led the league six times and set many NFL passing records. In addition to being a great passer and punter, Baugh was also a superior defensive player as he led the NFL in interceptions in 1943.

1951

Dan McGugin

Coach

Close X

1951

Dan McGugin

Position:
Coach
Schools
Vanderbilt University, 1905 to 1917
Vanderbilt University, 1919 to 1934
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Tingley, IA
Date of Birth:
July 29/1879
Place of Death:
Memphis, TN
Date of Death:
November 9/1936
Wins:
197
Losses:
55
Ties:
19
Winning percentage:
0.762

Biography

Dan McGugin coached Vanderbilt 30 years in two terms, 1904-17 and 1919-34. In 1918 he served in the U.S. Army. His record was 197-55-19, earning him a place in the College Football Hall of Fame as a charter member in 1951. Fred Russell, the renowned football historian, summed up McGugin: "sensationally successful, winning glorious intersectional victories....responsible, more than any other man, for southern football gaining national recognition." He played football one year at Drake University then three years at Michigan 1901-03 and was left guard on the Michigan team which played in the first Rose Bowl Jan. 1, 1902. He graduated from Michigan with a law degree and began coaching at Vanderbilt in 1904. For many years he coached in the football season and practiced law in the interim. His first Vanderbilt team in 1904 went 9-0 and outscored the opposition 474-4. This team led the nation in scoring. McGugin coached four unbeaten teams and 11 teams which lost one game. He got Vanderbilt involved in intersectional games with Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Michigan, and Ohio State. In 1922, Vanderbilt built one of the first football stadium erected in the South. McGugin was an intense motivator, giving inspiring talks to his players. Some of his players became great coaches - Red Sanders, Jess Neely, Josh Cody, Ray Morrison.

1951

Red "The Galloping Ghost" Grange

Halfback

Close X

1951

Red "The Galloping Ghost" Grange

Position:
Halfback
School
University of Illinois, 1923 to 1925
Jersey Number:
77
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Wheaton, IL (Wheaton HS)
Place of Birth:
Forksville, PA
Date of Birth:
June 13/1903
Place of Death:
Lake Wales, FL
Date of Death:
January 28/1991
Height:
5'11
Weight:
175

Biography

Harold "Red" Grange was the miracle man of the 1920s, picked for the all-century team, named the "Galloping Ghost" because no one could catch him. During his time, Grange was to college football what Babe Ruth was to baseball. He was fast, elusive, football's greatest open-field runner up to his time. Here are some dates: October 6, 1923, the Grange makes his debut for Illinois against Nebraska with touchdown runs of 50, 35, 12 yards. October 18, 1924, he scores four touchdowns in the first 12 minutes against Michigan on runs of 95, 67, 56, 44 yards. For the day he carries the ball 21 times for 402 yards. November 8, 1924 he runs for 300 yards, passes for 177 against Chicago. October 31, 1925, Grange runs 36 times, gains 363 yards and has two 65-yard touchdowns against Pennsylvania. He played only 20 games in college but had 31 touchdowns and 3,362 yards. Over his career - high school at Wheaton, Illinois; college at Illinois, pro with the Chicago Bears, he carried the ball 4,103 times, gained 33,920 yards, an average of 8.4 per try. The three-time consensus All-America is still considered as one of the game's greatest players.

1951

Jim "Bright Path" Thorpe

Halfback

Close X

1951

Jim "Bright Path" Thorpe

Position:
Halfback
Schools
Carlisle Indian Institute, 1907 to 1908
Carlisle Indian Institute, 1911 to 1912
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Lawrence, KS (Haskell Institute), Carlisle, PA (Carlisle Indian Industrial School)
Place of Birth:
Prague, OK
Date of Birth:
May 28/1888
Place of Death:
Lomita, CA
Date of Death:
March 28/1953
Height:
6'1
Weight:
185

Biography

James Francis Thorpe was born May 28, 1888, on a Sac and Fox Reservation at Prague, Oklahoma. He played halfback for the Carlisle Indian School in 1907-08, again in 1911-12. In 44 games he had 53 touchdowns, 421 points. Statistics for 29 of the games show he averaged 8.4 yards in runs from scrimmage. In 1912, he had 29 touchdowns and 224 points, leading the nation. At the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm he won the pentathlon and decathlon. He played pro football 1915-28, major league baseball 1913-19, and witnesses said he excelled in any sport he tried. That included golf, tennis, lacrosse, field hockey, riding, rowing, gymnastics, archery, bowling, darts, billiards, basketball, swimming, boxing, wrestling. The honors piled up: 1950, named greatest athlete of the half-century 1900-49 by Associated Press sports editors; 1951, elected to College Football Hall of Fame; 1951, movie of his life "Jim Thorpe All-American" stars Burt Lancaster; 1957, a town, Jim Thorpe, Pa., named for him; 1963, elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame; 1984, a Jim Thorpe stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service; 1998, Thorpe again was honored with a stamp by the Postal Service. The sports writer Red Smith wrote: "Thorpe was the greatest athlete of his time, maybe of any time in any land."

1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Coach

Close X

1951

Frank "Buck" O'Neill

Position:
Coach
Schools
Syracuse University, 1906 to 1907
Columbia University, 1920 to 1922
Syracuse University, 1913 to 1919
Colgate University, 1904 to 1905
Colgate University, 1902 to 1902
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Syracuse, NY
Date of Birth:
March 6/1875
Place of Death:
Hamilton, NY
Date of Death:
April 21/1958
Wins:
81
Losses:
41
Ties:
8
Winning percentage:
0.654

Biography

Frank "Buck" O'Neill played football at Williams College and excelled at track as well as football. He was head coach at Colgate in 1902, again in 1904-05. His teams had an 18-8-2 record there. O'Neill moved to Syracuse and coached there for three terms: 1906-07, 1913-15, and 1917-19. He also maintained a law practice during these years. His eight-year coaching totals at Syracuse were 52-19-6. His best era at Syracuse came from 1915-1918 when the team had a combined 22-3-3 record O'Neill moved to Columbia and in 1920-22 had an 11-14 record. All told, he was a head coach 14 years with a record of 81-41-8. O'Neill was named a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

1951

Bennie Owen

Coach

Close X

1951

Bennie Owen

Position:
Coach
Schools
University of Oklahoma, 1905 to 1926
Bethany College (KS), 1901 to 1904
Washburn University, 1900 to 1900
Inducted:
1951
Place of Birth:
Chicago, IL
Date of Birth:
July 24/1875
Place of Death:
Houston, TX
Date of Death:
February 26/1970
Wins:
155
Losses:
60
Ties:
19
Winning percentage:
0.703

Biography

Benjamin G. "Bennie" Owen was Fielding Yost's quarterback for the undefeated Kansas team of 1899. The next year he was head coach at Washburn College. Then came years as head coach at Bethany College in Kansas and Oklahoma. In 1907, he lost an arm in a hunting accident. He stayed on the job and carved a career coaching record of 155-60-19 over 27 seasons. He had high scoring teams and was an early exponent of the forward pass. He was known for sportsmanship; his teams were always lectured on fair play. His 1911 team went 8-0 and outscored the enemy 282-15. In 1914 Oklahoma went 9-1-1 and led the nation in scoring with 435 points. Forest Geyer threw 25 touchdown passes that year. The 1915 team went 10-0 and scored 370 points. In 1918, the record was 6-0 and the scoring edge 278-7. Oklahoma won championships in the Southwest Conference in 1915 and 1918 and the Missouri Valley Conference in 1920. Owen served as director of athletics 1927-34. Owen Field, where Oklahoma plays its home games, is named for him. He was born July 24, 1875 in Chicago; he died February 26, 1970, in Houston at age 94. He was a charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, elected in 1951.

1951

Truxton "Trux" Hare

Guard

Close X

1951

Truxton "Trux" Hare

Position:
Guard
School
University of Pennsylvania, 1897 to 1900
Inducted:
1951
High School:
Southboro, MA (St. Mark's School)
Place of Birth:
Philadelphia, PA
Date of Birth:
October 12/1878
Place of Death:
Radnor, PA
Date of Death:
February 2/1956
Height:
6'1
Weight:
198

Biography

Thomas Truxton Hare is one of a handful of men to be a four-time first-team All-America. According to Walter Camp, Hare was the only player who could have made All-America at any position. He was selected as a charter member of the College Hall of Fame (1951), and has been named to numerous all-time All-America teams. Playing guard in the guards-back formation, Hare ran, punted, kicked off, and drop-kicked extra points. He called signals and was captain two years. He played every minute of every game for four years. Penn went 15-0 his first year, 1897, and was 47-5-2 in his career. He scored two touchdowns against Michigan in 1899 and made a 65-yard run against Cornell in 1900. He was on the 1900 Olympic track team at Paris, placing second in the hammer throw and first in the tug of war. He added a law degree at Penn in 1904, practiced law in Philadelphia, served as president of Bryn Mawr Hospital, excelled as a painter, and wrote eight books for boys.